reformed
Verb
  1. Simple past tense and past participle of reform
Adjective

reformed

  1. Corrected; amended; restored to purity or excellence; said, specifically, of the whole body of Protestant churches originating in the Reformation, or, in a more restricted sense, of those who separated from Martin Luther on the doctrine of consubstantiation, etc., and carried the Reformation, as they claimed, to a higher point.
    • 18, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 16, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volume (please specify ), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, OCLC 1069526323 ↗:
      |The town was one of the strongholds of the Reformed faith.||tr=|brackets=|subst=|lit=|nocat=1|footer=}}|}}
  2. Amended in character and life.
    a reformed gambler or drunkard
  3. (UK, military, of an officer) Retained in service on half or full pay after the disbandment of the company or troop.

Reformed
Adjective

reformed (not comparable)

  1. Of the whole body of Protestant churches originating in the Reformation.
  2. (self-identifier) Of the Protestant movement typically associated with John Calvin, as separated from the Lutheran Church to pursue more extensive reformation.
    • 18, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 16, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volume (please specify ), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, OCLC 1069526323 ↗:
      |The town was one of the strongholds of the Reformed faith.||tr=|brackets=|subst=|lit=|nocat=1|footer=}}|}}
  3. Of a restorational sect of Catholicism which does not commune with the Vatican, and incorporates evangelical Protestant ideologies.
Synonyms


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