rose
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ɹəʊz/
  • (America) IPA: /ɹoʊz/
Noun

rose (plural roses)

  1. A shrub of the genus Rosa, with red, pink, white or yellow flowers.
  2. A flower of the rose plant.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, The Tragedie of Romeo and Iuliet, Act II, Scene ii:
      Iu. 'Tis but thy name that is my Enemy:
      Thou art thy ſelfe...
      What's in a name? That which we call a Roſe,
      By any other word would ſmell as ſweete...
    • 1794, Robert Burns, "A Red, Red Rose:"
      O my Luve's like a red, red rose
      That's newly sprung in june...
    • 1913, Gertrude Stein, "Sacred Emily":
      Rose is a rose is a rose is a rose.
  3. A plant or species in the rose family. (Rosaceae)
  4. Something resembling a rose flower.
  5. (heraldiccharge) The rose flower, usually depicted with five petals, five barbs, and a circular seed.
  6. A purplish-red or pink colour, the colour of some rose flowers.
     
     
  7. A round nozzle for a sprinkling can or hose.
  8. The base of a light socket.
  9. Any of various large, red-bodied, papilionid butterflies of the genus Pachliopta.
  10. (mathematics) Any of various flower-like polar graphs of sinusoids or their squares.
  11. (mathematics, graph theory) A graph with only one vertex.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Verb

rose (roses, present participle rosing; past and past participle rosed)

  1. (poetic, transitive) To make rose-coloured; to redden or flush.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Life of Henry the Fift”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene ii]:
      A maid yet rosed over with the virgin crimson of modesty.
  2. (poetic, transitive) To perfume, as with roses.
Adjective

rose (not comparable)

  1. Having a purplish-red or pink colour. See rosy.
Translations Verb
  1. simple past tense of rise
  2. (now, colloquial and nonstandard) Past participle of rise
Related terms Noun

rose (plural roses)

  1. Alternative spelling of rosé

Rose
Proper noun
  1. A female given name.
    • c. 1598–1600, William Shakespeare, “As You Like It”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals):
      : Act I, Scene II:
      Celia: Therefore, my sweet Rose, my dear Rose, be merry.
      Rosalind. From henceforth I will, coz, and devise sports.
    • ~1886 William Ernest Henley, A Ballade of Ladies' Names, Gleeson White:Ballades and Rondeaus, Read Books 1887, page 19:
      Sentiment hallows the vowels of Delia; /Sweet simplicity breathes from Rose;
    • 1957 Ray Bradbury, Dandelion Wine, Avon Books 1999, ISBN 0380977265, page 248:
      An aunt had arrived and her name was Rose and you could hear her voice clarion clear above the others, and you could imagine her warm and huge as a hothouse rose, exactly like her name, filling any room she sat in.
    • 1980 P. D. James, Innocent Blood, Faber and Faber, ISBN 0571115667, page 170:
      Rose Ducton. Rosie Ducton. Philippa Rose Palfrey. A row of books with Rose Ducton on the spine. - - - Rose. It didn't even suit her. It was a name in a catalogue: Peace, Scarlet Wonder, Albertine. She had thought that she had got used to the knowledge that nothing about her was real, not even her name.
  2. Surname
Related terms Translations Noun

rose (plural roses)

  1. (Ireland, informal) A regional contestant in the annual Rose of Tralee contest.
  2. (Ireland, informal) The winner of that year's contest.



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