satan
Noun

satan (plural satans)

  1. Alternative form of Satan (especially in the sense "a demon follower of Satan; a fallen angel").
    • 1993, Jacob Lassner, Demonizing the Queen of Sheba, page 199 ↗,
      According to Wahb b. Munnabih, Muhammad b. Ka‘b, and other authorities: Solomon was led to this [test of her intelligence] because the satans feared that he would marry her and make her desirous of having his offspring. She would then disclose to him the secrets of the jinn, and they would never rid themselves of their subservience to Solomon and his offspring to follow.
    • 2004, Mark Allan Powell, 6: Satan and the Demons, Kathleen E. Corley, Robert L. Webb (editors), Jesus and Mel Gibson′s The Passion of the Christ: The Film, the Gospels and the Claims of History, page 72 ↗,
      He tells them to go away, calling them ‘You little satans!’ and then the children′s faces become ghoulish and they begin snapping at him, trying to bite him. A short time later, we see Judas being chased by about a dozen of these children; he falls and they kick and hit him. Twice, we see the figure of Satan (recognizable from the opening scene) standing among the demon-children.
Noun

satan (plural satans)

  1. Obsolete form of satin#English|satin.

Satan
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ˈseɪtən/
Proper noun
  1. (religion) The supreme evil spirit in the Abrahamic religions, who tempts humanity and rules Hell; the Devil; (in Theistic Satanism) the same figure, regarded as a deity to be revered and worshipped.
    Synonyms: Thesaurus:Satan
    • 1997, Martin Schuldiner, Puritan Casuistry, Martin Schuldiner (editor), The Tayloring Shop: Essays on the Poetry of Edward Taylor in Honor of Thomas M. and Virginia L. Davis, page 125 ↗:
      Having been captured by the forces of Christ, the souls are now attacked for the first time by their former captain in “Satans Rage at them in their Conversion.″ Satan′s basic line of attack is to accuse the souls of being unreliable converts. Just as the souls turned from Satan to Christ, so too they will turn back again when it suits them, says Satan.
    • 1998, Wendy Griswold, 8: The Devil, social change, and Jacobean theatre, Philip Smith (editor), The New American Cultural Sociology, page 127 ↗:
      The conventional role of Satan in English mystery plays was the Trickster archetype adapted for a theatre that was both popular and religious but constrained by traditional Christian theology.
      The Satan of the mystery plays was a Trickster, but a dignified one.
    • 2005, John Bradshaw, Healing the Shame That Binds You, page 2 ↗:
      Biblical scholars tell us that the idea of a purely evil being like the Devil or Satan was a late development in the Bible. In the book of Job, Satan was the heavenly district attorney whose job it was to test the faith of those who, like Job, were specially blessed.
      During the Persian conquest of the Israelites, the Satan of Job became fused with the Zoroastrian dualistic theology adopted by the Persians, where two opposing forces, one of good, Ahura Mazda, the Supreme Creator deity, was in a constant battle with Ahriman, the absolute god of evil. This polarized dualism was present in the theology of the Essenes and took hold in Christianity where God and his Son Jesus were in constant battle with the highest fallen angel, Satan, for human souls. This dualism persists today only in fundamentalist religions (Muslim terrorists, the Taliban, the extreme Christian Right and a major part of evangelical Christianity).
    Many Satanists reject the notion that Satan is bad.
  2. (religion, LaVeyan Satanism) The personification or symbol of pride, carnality, and liberty.
  3. A person or animal regarded as particularly malignant, detestable, or evil; used as an epithet or as a name for an animal.
Related terms Translations Noun

satan (plural satans)

  1. (countable) A demon follower of Satan (principal evil spirit); a fallen angel.
    • 1992, Clinton E. Arnold, Powers of Darkness: Principalities & Powers in Paul′s Letters, page 67 ↗,
      This literature refers to a major figurehead of evil called “Satan,” the leader of a group of angels also referred to as “Satans.” These Satans accuse people and lead them astray.
    • 2007, Abdullah Yusuf Ali (translator), M. A. H. Eliyasee (Roman script transliteration), Osman Taha (Arabic script), The Qur′an, II, 102,[in other editions, 96] page 15 ↗,
      They followed what the Satans recited over Solomon′s Kingdom. Solomon did not disbelieve but Satans disbelieved, teaching men, magic, and such things as came down at Babylon to the angels Hārūt and Mārūt.
Translations


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