abate
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /əˈbeɪt/
  • (America) IPA: /əˈbeɪt/
Verb

abate (abates, present participle abating; past and past participle abated)

  1. (transitive, obsolete, outside, law) To put an end to; to cause to cease. [attested since about 1150 to 1350]
    to abate a nuisance
  2. (intransitive) To become null and void. [attested since the late 15th century]
    The writ has abated.
  3. (transitive, legal) To nullify; make void. [attested since the late 15th century]
    to abate a writ
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To humble; to lower in status; to bring someone down physically or mentally. [attested from around 1150 to 1350 until the mid 1600s]
    • The hyer that they were in this present lyf, the moore shulle they be abated and defouled in helle.
  5. (intransitive, obsolete) To be humbled; to be brought down physically or mentally. [attested from around 1150 to 1350 until the mid 1600s]
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To curtail; to deprive. [attested from around 1350 to 1470 until the mid 1800s]
    Order restrictions and prohibitions to abate an emergency situation.
    • 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear, II.ii:
      She hath abated me of half my train.
  7. (transitive) To reduce in amount, size, or value. [attested since 1325]
    Legacies are liable to be abated entirely or in proportion, upon a deficiency of assets.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Deuteronomy 34:7 ↗:
      His eye was not dim, nor his natural force abated.
  8. (intransitive) To decrease in size, value, or amount. [attested since 1325]
  9. (transitive) To moderate; to lessen in force, intensity, to subside. [attested since around 1150 to 1350]
    • 1597, Francis Bacon Essays or Counsels, Civil and Morall ↗:
      Not that they feel it so, but only to abate the edge of envy.
    • 1855, Thomas Babington Macaulay, The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, Part 3, page 267 ↗:
      The fury of Glengarry […] rapidly abated.
  10. (intransitive) To decrease in intensity or force; to subside. [attested since around 1150 to 1350]
    • circa 1719 Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe:
      […] in the morning, the wind having abated overnight, the sea was calm, […]
  11. (transitive) To deduct or omit. [attested since around 1350 to 1470]
    We will abate this price from the total.
  12. (transitive) To bar or except. [attested since the late 1500s]
    • Abating his brutality, he was a very good master.
  13. (transitive) To cut away or hammer down, in such a way as to leave a figure in relief, as a sculpture, or in metalwork.
  14. (transitive, obsolete) To dull the edge or point of; to blunt. [attested from the mid 1500s till the late 1600s]
  15. (transitive, archaic) To destroy, or level to the ground. [attested since around 1350 to 1470]
    • 1542, Edward Hall, The Union of the Noble and Illustre Famelies of Lancastre and York:
      The kynge of Scottes planted his siege before the castell of Norham, and sore abated the walls.
Synonyms Antonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Noun

abate (plural abates)

  1. (obsolete) Abatement. [from around 1400 until the late 1600s]
Verb

abate (abates, present participle abating; past and past participle abated)

  1. (intransitive, law) to enter a tenement without permission after the owner has died and before the heir takes possession. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.]
Noun

abate (plural abates)

  1. an Italian abbot, or other member of the clergy. [First attested in the early 18th century.]



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