alarm
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /əˈlɑːm/
  • (GA) IPA: /əˈlɑɹm/
Noun

alarm

  1. A summons to arms, as on the approach of an enemy.
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene iii]:
      Arming to answer in a night alarm.
  2. Any sound or information intended to give notice of approaching danger; a warning sound to arouse attention; a warning of danger.
    • ii. 1.
      Sound an alarm in my holy mountain.
  3. A sudden attack; disturbance.
    • 1595 December 9 (first known performance)​, William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i]:
      these home alarms
    • 1725, Homer; [Elijah Fenton], transl., “Book I”, in The Odyssey of Homer. […], volume I, London: Printed for Bernard Lintot, OCLC 8736646 ↗, page III ↗:
      thy palace fill with insults and alarms
  4. Sudden surprise with fear or terror excited by apprehension of danger; in the military use, commonly, sudden apprehension of being attacked by surprise.
    • 18, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 1, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volume (please specify ), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, OCLC 1069526323 ↗:
  5. A mechanical device for awaking people, or rousing their attention.
    The clock radio is a friendlier version of the cold alarm by the bedside.
  6. An instance of an alarm ringing, beeping or clanging, to give a noise signal at a certain time.
    You should set the alarm on your watch to go off at seven o'clock.
Translations Translations Translations
  • German: Alarmstimmung
  • Portuguese: alarme
  • Russian: испу́г
Translations Translations
  • Russian: сигна́л трево́ги
  • Spanish: alarma
Verb

alarm (alarms, present participle alarming; past and past participle alarmed)

  1. (transitive) To call to arms for defense
  2. (transitive) To give (someone) notice of approaching danger
  3. (transitive) To rouse to vigilance and action; to put on the alert.
  4. (transitive) To surprise with apprehension of danger; to fill with anxiety in regard to threatening evil; to excite with sudden fear.
  5. (transitive) To keep in excitement; to disturb.
Translations
  • Spanish: tocar a rebato
Translations Translations Translations
  • German: in Alarmstimmung versetzen



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