appeal
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /əˈpiːl/
Verb

appeal (appeals, present participle appealing; past and past participle appealed)

  1. (intransitive) To call upon another to decide a question controverted, to corroborate a statement, to vindicate one's rights, etc.
    • I appeal to the Scriptures in the original.
    • 18, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 23, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volume (please specify ), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, OCLC 1069526323 ↗:
  2. (intransitive) To call on (someone) for aid
    I appeal to all of you to help the orphans.
  3. (transitive, legal, chiefly, US, informal elsewhere) To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court for the purpose of reexamination or for decision.
    • December 28, 2016, Calla Wahlquist writing in The Guardian, Supreme court upholds ruling that children are being held at adult prison unlawfully ↗
      The supreme court of Victoria has upheld a decision the transfer of juvenile detainees to an adult maximum security prison, where some of them spent Christmas Day, was unlawful. The Andrews government had appealed the original decision, which was handed down last week.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Acts 25:11 ↗:
      For if I be an offender, or have committed any thing worthy of death, I refuse not to die: but if there be none of these things whereof these accuse me, no man may deliver me unto them. I appeal unto Caesar.
  4. (intransitive) To be attractive.
    That idea appeals to me.
  5. (intransitive, cricket) To ask an umpire for a decision on whether a batsman is out or not, usually by saying "How's that" or "Howzat".
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To accuse (someone of something).
    • a. 1472, Thomas Malory, “(please specify the chapter)”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book VII, [London: […] by William Caxton], published 31 July 1485, OCLC 71490786 ↗; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur […], London: Published by David Nutt, […], 1889, OCLC 890162034 ↗:
      And there opynly Sir Mador appeled the quene of the deth of hys cousyn Sir Patryse.
    • 1595 December 9 (first known performance)​, William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i], page 23 ↗, column 1:
      Tell me moreouer, haſt thou ſounded him,
      If he appeale the Duke on ancient malice,
      Or worthily as a good ſubiect ſhould
      On ſome knowne ground of treacherie in him.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.9:
      He gan that Ladie strongly to appele / Of many haynous crymes by her enured […].
  7. To summon; to challenge.
    • 1820, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe; a Romance. [...] In Three Volumes, volume (please specify ), Edinburgh: Printed for Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Hurst, Robinson, and Co. […], OCLC 230694662 ↗:
  8. To invoke (used with to).
    • 1692, John Milton, A Defence of the People of England, in Answer to Salmasius's Defence of the King, tr. of Defensio pro Populo Anglicano, Ch. II.
      quote en
Translations Translations Translations Noun

appeal

  1. (legal)
    1. An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for re-examination or review.
    2. The mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected.
    3. The right of appeal.
    4. An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public.
      • 1595 December 9 (first known performance)​, William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i], page 23 ↗, column 1:
        OLd Iohn of Gaunt, time-honoured Lancaſter,
        Haſt thou according to thy oath and band
        Brought hither Henry Herford thy bold ſon:
        Heere to make good yͤ boiſtrous late appeale,
        Which then our leyſure would not let vs heare,
        Againſt the Duke of Norfolke, Thomas Mowbray?
    5. An accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver.
  2. A summons to answer to a charge.
  3. A call to a person or an authority for help, proof or a decision; entreaty.
    He made an appeal for volunteers to help at the festival.
    • 1626, Francis Bacon, Sylva Sylvarum, Or, A Naturall Historie: In Ten Centuries
      a kind of appeal to the Deity, or the author […] of great wonders
    1. (cricket) The act, by the fielding side, of asking an umpire for a decision on whether a batsman is out or not.
  4. Resort to physical means; recourse.
  5. The power to attract or interest.
Translations Translations
  • Portuguese: apelo
  • Russian: призы́в
Translations
  • French: attrait
  • German: Reiz
  • Portuguese: apelo
  • Russian: привлека́тельность



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