appellation
Pronunciation
  • (America) IPA: /ˌæpəˈleɪʃən/
Noun

appellation (plural appellations)

  1. (formal or dated) A name, title or designation.
    • 1912, Stratemeyer Syndicate, Baseball Joe on the School Nine Chapter 1
      "I'll not," retorted "Teeter" Nelson, whose first name was Harry, but who had gained his appellation because of a habit he had of "teetering" on his tiptoes when reciting in class. "I've got Peaches all right," and there was a struggle between the two lads, one trying to throw a snowball, and the other trying to prevent him.
    • 1925, Alfred Louis Kroeber, Handbook of the Indians of California (page 225)
      Russian River flows through a country of hill ridges, which in many places are dignifiable with the appellation of mountains.
    • 1990, Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky (translators), Fyodor Dostoevsky (author), The Brothers Karamazov, North Point Press, ISBN 0-86547-422-2, page 742:
      Gentlemen of the jury, what is a father, a real father, what does this great word mean, what terribly great idea is contained in this appellation?
  2. A geographical indication for wine that describes its geographic origin.
Related terms
  • appellation contrôlée
Translations Translations
  • German: Herkunftsbezeichnung



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