aside
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /əˈsaɪd/
Adverb

aside (not comparable)

  1. To or on one side so as to be out of the way.
    Move aside, please, so that these people can come through.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene i]:
      But soft! but soft! aside: here comes the king.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, 2 Kings 4:4 ↗:
      {...}} and thou shalt set aside that which is full.
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, chapter 4, in An Autobiography, part I, London: Collins, →ISBN:
      An indulgent playmate, Grannie would lay aside the long scratchy-looking letter she was writing (heavily crossed ‘to save notepaper’) and enter into the delightful pastime of ‘a chicken from Mr Whiteley's’.
Translations Noun

aside (plural asides)

  1. An incidental remark made quietly so as to be heard by the person to whom it is said and not by any others in the vicinity.
  2. (theatre) A brief comment by a character addressing the audience, unheard by other characters.
  3. A minor related mention, an afterthought.
Synonyms Translations Translations


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