attend
Pronunciation
  • (RP, GA) IPA: /əˈtɛnd/, [əˈtʰɛnd]
Verb

attend (attends, present participle attending; past and past participle attended)

  1. (archaic, transitive) To listen to (something or someone); to pay attention to; regard; heed. [from 15th c.]
    • The diligent pilot in a dangerous tempest doth not attend the unskilful words of the passenger.
  2. (archaic, intransitive) To listen (to, unto). [from 15th c.]
    • 1912, Rudyard Kipling, The Beginning of the Armadillos
      'Now attend to me,' said Painted Jaguar, 'because this is very important. […]
  3. (intransitive) To turn one's consideration (to); to deal with (a task, problem, concern etc.), to look after. [from 15th c.]
    Secretaries attend to correspondence.
  4. (ambitransitive) To wait upon as a servant etc.; to accompany to assist (someone). [from 15th c.]
    Valets attend to their employer's wardrobe.
    • The fifth had charge sick persons to attend.
    • c. 1590–1591, William Shakespeare, “The Two Gentlemen of Verona”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene iii]:
      youthful Valentine
      Attends the emperor in his royal court.
    • 18, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 13, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volume (please specify ), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, OCLC 1069526323 ↗:
  5. (transitive) To be present at (an event or place) in order to take part in some action or proceedings; to regularly go to (an event or place). [from 17th c.]
    Children must attend primary school.
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, p. 20:
      I attended a one-room school next door to the palace and studied English, Xhosa, history and geography.
  6. (intransitive, legal) To go to (a place) for some purpose (with at).
  7. To be present with; to accompany; to be united or consequent to.
    a measure attended with ill effects
    • 1697, John Dryden, The Georgics
      What cares must then attend the toiling swain.
  8. To wait for; to await; to remain, abide, or be in store for.
    • 1689 (indicated as 1690), [John Locke], An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding. […], London: […] Thomas Basset, […], OCLC 153628242 ↗:
      the different state of perfect happiness or misery that attends all men after this
    • 1665, John Dryden, ''''
      Three days I promised to attend my doom.
Synonyms Related terms Translations Translations Translations Verb

attend (attends, present participle attending; past and past participle attended)

  1. Alternative form of atend "to kindle".
Related terms


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