awkward
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /ˈɔːkwəd/
  • (GA) IPA: /ˈɔkwɚd/
  • (Canada, cot-caught) IPA: /ˈɑkwɚd/
Adverb

awkward

  1. (obsolete) In a backwards direction.
    • a. 1472, Thomas Malory, “Capitulum X”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book V, [London: […] by William Caxton], published 31 July 1485, OCLC 71490786 ↗; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur […], London: Published by David Nutt, […], 1889, OCLC 890162034 ↗:
      :
      Than groned the knyght for his grymme woundis, and gyrdis to Sir Gawayne and awkewarde hym strykes, and […] kut thorow a vayne […].
Adjective

awkward (comparative awkwarder, superlative awkwardest)

  1. Lacking dexterity in the use of the hands, or of instruments.
    John was awkward at performing the trick. He'll have to practice to improve.
    Synonyms: clumsy, lubberly, ungraceful, unhandy
    Antonyms: dexterous, gainly, graceful, handy, skillful
  2. Not easily managed or effect#Verb|effected; embarrassing.
    That was an extremely awkward moment. Everyone was watching.
    An awkward silence had fallen.
  3. Lacking social skills, or uncomfortable with social interaction.
    I'm very awkward at parties.
    Things get very awkward whenever 60-year old men use cheesy pick-up lines on me.
    Synonyms: maladroit
    Antonyms: amiable, cool
  4. Perverse; adverse; difficult to handle.
    He's a right awkward chap.
    These cabinets are going to be very awkward when we move.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Noun

awkward (plural awkwards)

  1. Someone or something that is awkward.



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