band
Pronunciation
  • enPR: bănd, IPA: /bænd/
  • (ae-tensing) IPA: [beənd]
Noun

band (plural bands)

  1. A strip of material used for strengthening or coupling.
    1. A strip of material wrapped around things to hold them together.
    2. A narrow strip of cloth or other material on clothing, to bind, strengthen, or ornament it.
      • 1843, Thomas Hood, The Song of the Shirt
        band and gusset and seam
    3. A strip along the spine of a book where the pages are attached.
    4. A belt or strap that is part of a machine.
  2. A long strip of material, color, etc, that is different from the surrounding area.
    sandstone with bands of shale
  3. (architecture) A strip of decoration.
    1. A continuous tablet, stripe, or series of ornaments, as of carved foliage, of colour, or of brickwork.
    2. In Gothic architecture, the moulding, or suite of mouldings, which encircles the pillars and small shafts.
  4. That which serves as the means of union or connection between persons; a tie.
    • c. 1598–1600, William Shakespeare, “As You Like It”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene iv]:
      We, ignorant of ourselves, / Beg often our own harms.
  5. A linen collar or ruff worn in the 16th and 17th centuries.
  6. (in the plural) Two strips of linen hanging from the neck in front as part of a clerical, legal, or academic dress.
  7. (physics) A part of the electromagnetic spectrum.
  8. (physics) A group of energy levels in a solid state material.
    valence band;  conduction band
  9. (obsolete) A bond.
    • 1595 December 9 (first known performance)​, William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i], page 23 ↗, column 1:
      OLd Iohn of Gaunt, time-honoured Lancaſter,
      Haſt thou according to thy oath and band
      Brought hither Henry Herford thy bold ſon:
      Heere to make good yͤ boiſtrous late appeale,
      Which then our leyſure would not let vs heare,
      Againſt the Duke of Norfolke, Thomas Mowbray?
  10. (obsolete) Pledge; security.
  11. (especially, American English) A ring, such as a wedding ring (wedding band), or a ring put on a bird's leg to identify it.
  12. (sciences) Any distinguishing line formed by chromatography, electrophoresis etc
  13. (medicine) Short for band cell#English|band cell.
  14. (slang, hiphop, often in the plural) A wad of money totaling $1K, held together by a band; (by extension) money
Translations Translations
  • Russian: манже́тка
Translations
  • Russian: ле́нта
Translations Translations Verb

band (bands, present participle banding; past and past participle banded)

  1. (transitive) To fasten with a band.
  2. (transitive, ornithology) To fasten an identifying band around the leg of (a bird).
Translations Translations Noun

band (plural bands)

  1. A group of musicians who perform together as an ensemble, usually for a professional recording artist.
  2. A type of orchestra originally playing janissary music.
  3. A marching band.
  4. A group of people loosely united for a common purpose (a band of thieves).
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      But in the meantime Robin Hood and his band lived quietly in Sherwood Forest, without showing their faces abroad, for Robin knew that it would not be wise for him to be seen in the neighborhood of Nottingham, those in authority being very wroth with him.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Chapter 23
      "My third command to the Winged Monkeys," said Glinda, "shall be to carry you to your forest. Then, having used up the powers of the Golden Cap, I shall give it to the King of the Monkeys, that he and his band may thereafter be free for evermore."
  5. (anthropology) A small group of people living in a simple society.
  6. (Canada) A group of aboriginals that has official recognition as an organized unit by the federal government of Canada.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Verb

band (bands, present participle banding; past and past participle banded)

  1. (intransitive) To group together for a common purpose; to confederate.
    • Bible, Acts xxiii. 12
      Certain of the Jews banded together.
  2. (transitive, education) To group (students) together by perceived ability; to stream.
Translations Verb
  1. (obsolete) Simple past tense and past participle of bind



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