blaze
Pronunciation Noun

blaze (plural blazes)

  1. A fire, especially a fast-burning fire producing a lot of flames and light.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter III, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326 ↗:
      Long after his cigar burnt bitter, he sat with eyes fixed on the blaze. When the flames at last began to flicker and subside, his lids fluttered, then drooped; but he had lost all reckoning of time when he opened them again to find Miss Erroll in furs and ball-gown kneeling on the hearth and heaping kindling on the coals, […].
  2. Intense, direct light accompanied with heat.
    to seek shelter from the blaze of the sun
    • 1671, John Milton, “Samson Agonistes, […]”, in Paradise Regain’d. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is Added, Samson Agonistes, London: Printed by J. M[acock] for John Starkey […], OCLC 228732398 ↗, page 13 ↗:
      O dark, dark, dark, amid the blaze of noon,
  3. The white or lighter-coloured markings on a horse's face.
    The palomino had a white blaze on its face.
  4. A high-visibility orange colour, typically used in warning signs and hunters' clothing.
  5. A bursting out, or active display of any quality; an outburst.
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene v]:
      his blaze of wrath
    • 1671, John Milton, “Book the Third”, in Paradise Regain’d. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is Added, Samson Agonistes, London: Printed by J. M[acock] for John Starkey […], OCLC 228732398 ↗, page 56 ↗:
      For what is glory but the blaze of fame?
  6. A spot made on trees by chipping off a piece of the bark, usually as a surveyor's mark.
  7. (poker) A hand consisting of five face cards.
Translations Translations Verb

blaze (blazes, present participle blazing; past and past participle blazed)

  1. (intransitive) To be on fire, especially producing bright flames.
    The campfire blazed merrily.
  2. (intransitive) To send forth or reflect a bright light; shine like a flame.
    • And far and wide the icy summit blazed.
  3. (intransitive, poetic) To be conspicuous; shine brightly a brilliancy (of talents, deeds, etc.).
  4. (transitive, rare) To set in a blaze; burn.
  5. (transitive) To cause to shine forth; exhibit vividly; be resplendent with.
  6. (transitive, only in the past participle) To mark with a white spot on the face (as a horse).
  7. (transitive) To set a mark on (as a tree, usually by cutting off a piece of its bark).
  8. (transitive) To indicate or mark out (a trail, especially through vegetation) by a series of blazes.
    The guide blazed his way through the undergrowth.
  9. (transitive, figurative) To set a precedent for the taking-on of a challenge; lead by example.
    Darwin blazed a path for the rest of us.
  10. (figurative) To be furiously angry; to speak or write in a rage.
    • 1929, Reginald Charles Barker, The Hair-trigger Brand (page 160)
      "I'll die before I let my grandad pay you that much money!" blazed the girl.
  11. (slang) To smoke marijuana.
Related terms Translations Translations Translations Verb

blaze (blazes, present participle blazing; past and past participle blazed)

  1. (transitive) To blow, as from a trumpet
  2. (transitive) To publish; announce publicly
  3. (transitive) To disclose; bewray; defame
  4. (transitive, heraldry) To blazon
Noun

blaze (plural blazes)

  1. Publication; the act of spreading widely by report

Blaze
Proper noun
  1. A male given name.
  2. Surname



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