blunt
Pronunciation
  • (British, America) IPA: /blʌnt/
Adjective

blunt (comparative blunter, superlative bluntest)

  1. Having a thick edge or point; not sharp.
    • c. 1593, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedy of Richard the Third: […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene iv]:
      The murderous knife was dull and blunt.
  2. Dull in understanding; slow of discernment; opposed to acute.
    • 1598–1599 (first performance), William Shakespeare, “Much Adoe about Nothing”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene v]:
      His wits are not so blunt.
  3. Abrupt in address; plain; unceremonious; wanting the forms of civility; rough in manners or speech.
    the blunt admission that he had never liked my company
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Ivlivs Cæsar”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene ii]:
      a plain, blunt man
  4. Hard to impress or penetrate.
    • December 30, 1736, Alexander Pope, letter to Jonathan Swift
      I find my heart hardened and blunt to new impressions.}}
  5. Slow or deficient in feeling: insensitive.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations Noun

blunt (plural blunts)

  1. A fencer's practice foil with a soft tip.
  2. A short needle with a strong point.
  3. (smoking) A marijuana cigar.
    • 2005: to make his point, lead rapper B-Real fired up a blunt in front of the cameras and several hundred thousand people and announced, “I'm taking a hit for every one of y'all!” — Martin Torgoff, Can't Find My Way Home (Simon & Schuster 2005, p. 461)
  4. (UK, slang, archaic, uncountable) money
    • 1836 March – 1837 October, Charles Dickens, chapter 10, in The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, London: Chapman and Hall, […], published 1837, OCLC 28228280 ↗:
      Down he goes to the Commons, to see the lawyer and draw the blunt […]
  5. A playboating move resembling a cartwheel performed on a wave.
Translations Verb

blunt (blunts, present participle blunting; past and past participle blunted)

  1. To dull the edge or point of, by making it thicker; to make blunt.
  2. (figuratively) To repress or weaken; to impair the force, keenness, or susceptibility, of
    It blunted my appetite.
    My feeling towards her have been blunted.
Synonyms Translations Translations


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