bore
Pronunciation
  • (America) IPA: /bɔɹ/
  • (RP) IPA: /bɔː/
  • (rhotic, horse-hoarse) IPA: /bo(ː)ɹ/
  • (nonrhotic, horse-hoarse) IPA: /boə/
Verb

bore (bores, present participle boring; past and past participle bored)

  1. (transitive) To inspire boredom in somebody.
    • […] used to come and bore me at rare intervals.
  2. (transitive) To make a hole through something.
    • c. 1595–1596, William Shakespeare, “A Midsommer Nights Dreame”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene ii]:
      I'll believe as soon this whole earth may be bored.
  3. (intransitive) To make a hole with, or as if with, a boring instrument; to cut a circular hole by the rotary motion of a tool.
    to bore for water or oil
    An insect bores into a tree.
  4. (transitive) To form or enlarge (something) by means of a boring instrument or apparatus.
    to bore a steam cylinder or a gun barrel; to bore a hole
    • short but very powerful jaws, by means whereof the insect can bore […] a cylindrical passage through the most solid wood
  5. (transitive) To make (a passage) by laborious effort, as in boring; to force a narrow and difficult passage through.
    to bore one's way through a crowd
    • What bustling crowds I bored.
  6. (intransitive) To be pierced or penetrated by an instrument that cuts as it turns.
    This timber does not bore well.
  7. (intransitive) To push forward in a certain direction with laborious effort.
    • They take their flight […] boring to the west.
  8. (of a horse) To shoot out the nose or toss it in the air.
  9. (obsolete) To fool; to trick.
Synonyms Antonyms Related terms Translations Translations Noun

bore (plural bores)

  1. A hole drilled or milled through something, or (by extension) its diameter.
    the bore of a cannon
    • 1626, Francis Bacon, Sylva Sylvarum, Or, A Naturall Historie: In Ten Centuries
      the bores of wind-instruments
  2. The tunnel inside of a gun's barrel through which the bullet travels when fired, or (by extension) its diameter.
  3. A tool, such as an auger, for making a hole by boring.
  4. A capped well drilled to tap artesian water. The place where the well exists.
  5. One who inspires boredom or lack of interest.
  6. Something that wearies by prolixity or dullness; a tiresome affair.
    • It is as great a bore as to hear a poet read his own verses.
  7. Calibre; importance.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene vi]:
      Yet are they much too light for the bore of the matter.
Synonyms Translations
  • German: Bohrung
  • Italian: foro
  • Russian: отве́рстие
Translations Translations Translations Noun

bore (plural bores)

  1. A sudden and rapid flow of tide occuring in certain rivers and estuaries which rolls up as a wave
Synonyms Translations
  • French: mascaret
  • German: Gezeitenwelle
  • Italian: flusso anomalo, ondata anomala
Verb
  1. simple past tense of bear
  2. (now, colloquial, nonstandard) Past participle of bear



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