borne
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /bɔːn/
  • (America) IPA: /bɔɹn/
  • (rhotic, horse-hoarse) IPA: /bo(ː)ɹn/
  • (nonrhotic, horse-hoarse) IPA: /boən/
Verb
  1. past participle of bear#English|bear
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene ii], [https://books.google.com/books?id=uNtBAQAAMAAJ&pg=PAMiranda}}: I ſhould ſinne / To thinke but Noblie of my Grand-mother, / Good wombes haue borne bad ſonnes. page Miranda}}: I ſhould ſinne / To thinke but Noblie of my Grand-mother, / Good wombes haue borne bad ſonnes.]:
      {smallcaps
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, The Dust of Conflict, chapter 21 ↗:
      “Can't you understand that love without confidence is a worthless thing—and that had you trusted me I would have borne any obloquy with you. […] ”
Adjective

borne (not comparable)

  1. carried, supported.
    • 1901, Joseph Conrad, Falk: A Reminiscence:
      In the last rays of the setting sun, you could pick out far away down the reach his beard borne high up on the white structure, foaming up stream to anchor for the night.
    • 1881 Oscar Wilde, "Rome Unvisited", Poems, page 44 ↗:
      When, bright with purple and with gold,
      Come priest and holy cardinal,
      And borne above the heads of all
      The gentle Shepherd of the Fold.
    • c. 2000, David Irving v. Penguin Books and Deborah Lipstadt, II:
      Irving is further required, as a matter of practice, to spell out what he contends are the specific defamatory meanings borne by those passages.
Translations


This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.005
Offline English dictionary