bound
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ˈbaʊnd/
Verb
  1. Simple past tense and past participle of bind
    ''I bound the splint to my leg.
    ''I had bound the splint with duct tape.
Adjective

bound (not comparable)

  1. (with infinitive) Obliged (to).
    You are not legally bound to reply.
  2. (with infinitive) Very likely (to), certain to
    They were bound to come into conflict eventually.
  3. (linguistics, of a morpheme) That cannot stand alone as a free word.
  4. (mathematics, logic, of a variable) Constrained by a quantifier.
  5. (dated) Constipated; costive.
  6. Confined or restricted to a certain place; e.g. railbound.
  7. Unable to move in certain conditions; e.g. snowbound.
Antonyms
  • (logic: constrained by a quantifier) free
Related terms Translations Translations
  • Russian: непреме́нный
Translations Noun

bound (plural bounds)

  1. (often, used in plural) A boundary, the border which one must cross in order to enter or leave a territory.
    I reached the northern bound of my property, took a deep breath and walked on.
    Somewhere within these bounds you may find a buried treasure.
  2. (mathematics) A value which is known to be greater or smaller than a given set of values.
Translations Translations Verb

bound (bounds, present participle bounding; past and past participle bounded)

  1. To surround a territory or other geographical entity.
    France, Portugal, Gibraltar and Andorra bound Spain.
    Kansas is bounded by Nebraska on the north, Missouri on the east, Oklahoma on the south and Colorado on the west.
  2. (mathematics) To be the boundary of.
Translations Noun

bound (plural bounds)

  1. A sizeable jump, great leap.
    The deer crossed the stream in a single bound.
  2. A spring from one foot to the other in dancing.
  3. (dated) A bounce; a rebound.
    the bound of a ball
Translations Verb

bound (bounds, present participle bounding; past and past participle bounded)

  1. (intransitive) To leap, move by jumping.
    The rabbit bounded down the lane.
  2. (transitive) To cause to leap.
    to bound a horse
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Life of Henry the Fift”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals):
      , Act V, Scene II, page 93 ↗:
      […] Or if I might buffet for my Loue, or bound my Horſe for her fauours, I could lay on like a Butcher, and fit like a Iack an Apes, neuer off.
  3. (intransitive, dated) To rebound; to bounce.
    a rubber ball bounds on the floor
  4. (transitive, dated) To cause to rebound; to throw so that it will rebound; to bounce.
    to bound a ball on the floor
Translations Adjective

bound

  1. (obsolete) Ready, prepared.
    1. Ready to start or go (to); moving in the direction (of).
      Which way are you bound?
      Is that message bound for me?
      • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene ii], page 4 ↗:
        {w
Translations Translations


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