bounden
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /ˈbaʊnd(ə)n/
  • (GA) IPA: /ˈbaʊndən/
Adjective

bounden

  1. (dated) Now chiefly in the term bounden duty: made obligatory; binding#Adjective|binding.
    • 1549 March 16, Thomas Cranmer [et al.], compilers, “The Supper of the Lorde, and the Holy Communion, Commonly Called the Masse”, in The Booke of the Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacramentes, […], London: In officina Edowardi Whitchurche […], OCLC 56485293 ↗, folio cxxix, recto ↗:
      And although we be vnworthy (through our manyfolde ſynnes) to offre vnto thee any Sacryfice: Yet we beſeche thee to accepte thys our bounden duetie and ſeruice: and commande theſe our prayers and ſupplicacions, by the Miniſtery of thy holy Angels, to be brought vp into thy holy Tabernacle before the ſyght of thy dyuine maieſtie: {{...}
    • 1814 July 6, [Walter Scott], chapter XIX, in Waverley; or, ’Tis Sixty Years Since. In Three Volumes, volume III, Edinburgh: Printed by James Ballantyne and Co. for Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, OCLC 270129598 ↗, page 282 ↗:
      That I wad wi' a' my heart; and mickle obliged to your honour for putting me in mind o' my bounden duty.
    • 1847 January – 1848 July, William Makepeace Thackeray, “Miss Crawley at Nurse”, in Vanity Fair. A Novel without a Hero, London: Bradbury and Evans, […], published 1848, OCLC 3174108 ↗, page 165 ↗:
      She imparted these stories gradually to Miss Crawley; gave her the whole benefit of them; felt it to be her bounden duty as a Christian woman and mother of a family to do so; had not the smallest remorse or compunction for the victim whom her tongue was immolating; nay, very likely thought her act was quite meritorious, and plumed herself upon her resolute manner of performing it.
  2. (obsolete) Bound.
Verb
  1. (transitive, archaic, rare) Past participle of bind.
    Synonyms: bound, ybounden
    Antonyms: unbounden
    1. (intransitive, archaic, specifically) To be obliged#Adjective|obliged; to be under a duty or obligation (to do something).
      • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, “The Life and Death of King Iohn”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene iii], page 11 ↗, column 2:
        I am much bounden to your Maieſty.



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