braid
Pronunciation Verb

braid (braids, present participle braiding; past braided, past participle braided)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To make a sudden movement with, to jerk.
  2. (archaic, intransitive) To start into motion.
  3. (transitive) To weave together, intertwine (strands of fibers, ribbons, etc.); to arrange (hair) in braids.
  4. To mix, or make uniformly soft, by beating, rubbing, or straining, as in preparing food.
  5. (obsolete) To reproach; to upbraid.
    • c. 1607–1608, William Shakeſpeare, The Late, And much admired Play, Called Pericles, Prince of Tyre. […], London: Imprinted at London for Henry Goſſon,  […], published 1609, OCLC 78596089 ↗, [Act I, scene i]:
      Great King, / Few loue to heare the ſinnes they loue to act, / T'would brayde your ſelfe too neare for me to tell it {{...}
Translations Translations Noun

braid (plural braids)

  1. (obsolete) A sudden movement; a jerk, a wrench. [11th-17thc.]
    • a. 1472, Thomas Malory, “Capitulum ii”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book XII, [London: […] by William Caxton], published 31 July 1485, OCLC 71490786 ↗; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur […], London: Published by David Nutt, […], 1889, OCLC 890162034 ↗:
      And than in a brayde Sir Launcelot brake hys chaynes of hys legges and of hys armys (and in the brakynge he hurte hys hondys sore) […].
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. A weave of three or more strands of fibers, ribbons, cords or hair often for decoration. [from 16thc.]
  3. A stranded wire composed of a number of smaller wires twisted together
  4. A tubular sheath made of braided strands of metal placed around a central cable for shielding against electromagnetic interference.
  5. A fancy; freak; caprice.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • German: Geflecht, Abschirmgeflecht, Schutzgeflecht
Adjective

braid

  1. (obsolete) Deceitful.
    • c. 1604–1605, William Shakespeare, “All’s VVell, that Ends VVell”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene 2]:
      Since Frenchmen are so braid, / Marry that will, I live and die a maid.



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