breech
Pronunciation
  • (British, America) IPA: /bɹiːtʃ/
Noun

breech

  1. (historical, now only in the plural) A garment whose purpose is to cover or clothe the buttocks. [from 11th c.]
  2. (now rare) The buttocks or backside. [from 16th c.]
    • 1624, John Smith, Generall Historie, in Kupperman 1988, p. 157:
      And he made a woman for playing the whore, sit upon a great stone, on her bare breech twenty-foure houres, onely with corne and water, every three dayes, till nine dayes were past […]
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Book III ch viii
      "Oho!" says Thwackum, "you will not! then I will have it out of your br—h;" that being the place to which he always applied for information on every doubtful occasion.
  3. The part of a cannon or other firearm behind the chamber. [from 16th c.]
  4. (nautical) The external angle of knee timber, the inside of which is called the throat.
  5. A breech birth.
Translations Translations
  • French: culasse
  • German: Schwanzschraube
  • Italian: culatta
  • Russian: казённик
Adverb

breech (not comparable)

  1. With the hips coming out before the head.
Adjective

breech (not comparable)

  1. Born, or having been born, breech.
Verb

breech (breeches, present participle breeching; past and past participle breeched)

  1. (dated, transitive) To dress in breeches. (especially) To dress a boy in breeches or trousers for the first time.
    • 1748-1832, Jeremy Bentham, The Works of Jeremy Bentham, Volume 10:
      […] it occurred before I was breeched, and I was breeched at three years and a quarter old;
    • 18, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 10, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volume (please specify ), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, OCLC 1069526323 ↗:
  2. (dated, transitive) To beat or spank on the buttocks.
  3. (transitive) To fit or furnish with a breech.
    to breech a gun
  4. (transitive) To fasten with breeching.
  5. (poetic, transitive, obsolete) To cover as if with breeches.
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene iii]:
      Their daggers unmannerly breeched with gore.



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