bright
Pronunciation Adjective

bright (comparative brighter, superlative brightest)

  1. Visually dazzling; luminous, lucent, clear, radiant; not dark.
    Could you please dim the light? It's far too bright.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314 ↗, page 0045 ↗:
      Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes. The clear light of the bright autumn morning had no terrors for youth and health like hers.
    • The earth was dark, but the heavens were bright.
    • 18, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 10, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volume (please specify ), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, OCLC 1069526323 ↗:
    • The sun was bright o'erhead.
  2. Having a clear, quick intellect; intelligent.
    He's very bright. He was able to solve the problem without my help.
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[[Episode 16]]”, in Ulysses, Paris: Shakespeare & Co.; Sylvia Beach, OCLC 560090630 ↗; republished London: Published for the Egoist Press, London by John Rodker, Paris, October 1922, OCLC 2297483 ↗:
      —Ah, God, Corley replied, sure I couldn't teach in a school, man. I was never one of your bright ones, he added with a half laugh.
  3. Vivid, colourful, brilliant.
    The orange and blue walls of the sitting room were much brighter than the dull grey walls of the kitchen.
    • 1709, Alexander Pope, Pastorals, Spring:
      Here the bright crocus and blue violet grew.
  4. Happy, in good spirits.
    I woke up today feeling so bright that I decided to have a little dance.
  5. Sparkling with wit; lively; vivacious; cheerful.
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene ii]:
      Be bright and jovial among your guests.
  6. Illustrious; glorious.
    • the brightest annals of a female reign
  7. Clear; transparent.
    • From the brightest wines / He'd turn abhorrent.
  8. (archaic) Manifest to the mind, as light is to the eyes; clear; evident; plain.
    • with brighter evidence, and with surer success
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations Noun

bright (plural brights)

  1. An artist's brush used in oil and acrylic painting with a long ferrule and a flat, somewhat tapering bristle head.
  2. (obsolete) splendour; brightness
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 3”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      Dark with excessive bright thy skirts appear.
  3. (neologism) A person with a naturalistic worldview with no supernatural or mystical elements.
  4. (US, in the plural) The high-beam intensity of motor vehicle headlamps.
    Your brights are on.
Antonyms
Bright
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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