burn
Pronunciation Noun

burn

  1. A physical injury caused by heat, cold, electricity, radiation or caustic chemicals.
    She had second-degree burns from falling in the bonfire.
  2. A sensation resembling such an injury.
    Chili burn from eating hot peppers.
  3. The act of burning something with fire.
    They're doing a controlled burn of the fields.
  4. (slang) An intense non-physical sting, as left by shame or an effective insult.
  5. (slang) An effective insult, often in the expression sick burn excellent or badass insult.
  6. Physical sensation in the muscles following strenuous exercise, caused by build-up of lactic acid.
    One and, two and, keep moving; feel the burn!
  7. (uncountable, UK, chiefly, prison slang) Tobacco.
  8. (computing) The writing of data to a permanent storage medium like a compact disc or a ROM chip.
    • 2003, Maria Langer, Mac OS X 10.2 Advanced (page 248)
      Allow additional burns enables you to create a multisession CD, which can be used again to write more data.
  9. The operation or result of burning or baking, as in brickmaking.
    They have a good burn.
  10. A disease in vegetables; brand.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • Portuguese: queimação
  • Spanish: quemazón
Verb

burn (burns, present participle burning; past and past participle burned)

  1. (transitive) To cause to be consumed by fire.
    He burned his manuscript in the fireplace.
  2. (intransitive) To be consumed by fire, or in flames.
    He watched the house burn.
  3. (transitive) To overheat so as to make unusable.
    He burned the toast. The blacksmith burned the steel.
  4. (intransitive) To become overheated to the point of being unusable.
    The grill was too hot and the steak burned.
  5. (transitive) To make or produce by the application of fire or burning heat.
    to burn a hole;  to burn letters into a block
  6. (transitive) To injure (a person or animal) with heat or chemicals that produce similar damage.
    She burned the child with an iron, and was jailed for ten years.
  7. (transitive, surgery) To cauterize.
  8. (ambitransitive) To sunburn.
    She forgot to put on sunscreen and burned.
  9. (transitive) To consume, injure, or change the condition of, as if by action of fire or heat; to affect as fire or heat does.
    to burn the mouth with pepper
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, “The Life and Death of King Iohn”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene iii]:
      This tyrant fever burns me up.
    • This dry sorrow burns up all my tears.
    • 4:2 (AMP)
      You are jealous and covet [what others have] and your desires go unfulfilled; [so] you become murderers. [To hate is to murder as far as your hearts are concerned.] You burn with envy and anger and are not able to obtain [the gratification, the contentment, and the happiness that you seek], so you fight and war. You do not have, because you do not ask.
  10. (intransitive) To be hot, e.g. due to embarrassment.
    The child's forehead was burning with fever.  Her cheeks burned with shame.
  11. (chemistry, transitive) To cause to combine with oxygen or other active agent, with evolution of heat; to consume; to oxidize.
    A human being burns a certain amount of carbon at each respiration.  to burn iron in oxygen
  12. (chemistry, dated) To combine energetically, with evolution of heat.
    Copper burns in chlorine.
  13. (transitive, computing) To write data to a permanent storage medium like a compact disc or a ROM chip.
    We’ll burn this program onto an EEPROM one hour before the demo begins.
  14. (transitive, slang) To betray.
    The informant burned him.
  15. (transitive, slang) To insult or defeat.
    I just burned you again.
  16. (transitive) To waste (time); to waste money or other resources.
    We have an hour to burn.
    The company has burned more than a million dollars a month this year.
  17. In certain games, to approach near to a concealed object which is sought.
    You're cold... warm... hot... you're burning!
  18. (intransitive, curling) To accidentally touch a moving stone.
  19. (transitive, cards) In pontoon, to swap a pair of cards for another pair, or to deal a dead card.
  20. (photography) To increase the exposure for certain areas of a print in order to make them lighter (compare dodge).
  21. (intransitive, physics, of an element) To be converted to another element in a nuclear fusion reaction, especially in a star
  22. (intransitive, slang, card games, gambling) To discard.
  23. (slang, dated) To shoot someone with a firearm.
Related terms Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • French: se consumer
  • Portuguese: queimar, arder
  • Russian: горе́ть
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Noun

burn (plural burns)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland) A stream#Noun|stream.
    • 1881, Gerard Manley Hopkins, “Inversnaid”, in Robert Bridges, editor, Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins: Now First Published […], London: Humphrey Milford, published 1918, OCLC 5093462 ↗, stanza 1, page 53 ↗:
      This darksome burn, horseback brown, / His rollrock highroad roaring down, / In coop and in comb the fleece of his foam / Flutes and low to the lake falls home.
    • 1881, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginibus Puerisque:
      He may pitch on some tuft of lilacs over a burn, and smoke innumerable pipes to the tune of the water on the stones.
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, page 105:
      When it was too heavy rain the burn ran very high and wide and ye could never jump it.
Related terms Translations
  • German: Bach
  • Russian: руче́й

Burn
Proper noun
  1. A village in Selby, North Yorkshire (OS grid ref SE5928).
  2. Surname



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