cause
Pronunciation
  • (RP) enPR: kôz, IPA: /kɔːz/, [kʰɔːz]
  • (America) IPA: /kɔz/, [kʰɔːz]

Noun

cause

  1. (countable, often with of, typically of adverse results) The source of, or reason for, an event or action; that which produces or effects a result.
    They identified a burst pipe as the cause of the flooding.
    • 1595 December 9 (first known performance)​, William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i], page 23 ↗, column 1:
      We thanke you both, yet one but flatters vs,
      As well appeareth by the cauſe you come,
      Namely, to appeale each other of high treaſon.
  2. (uncountable, especially with for and a bare noun) Sufficient reason for a state, as of emotion.
    There is no cause for alarm.
    ''The end of the war was a cause for celebration.
  3. (countable) A goal, aim or principle, especially one which transcends purely selfish ends.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, “The First Part of Henry the Fourth, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene i]:
      God befriend us, as our cause is just.
    • The part they take against me is from zeal to the cause.
  4. (obsolete) Sake; interest; advantage.
    • Bible, 2 Corinthians 7:12
      I did it not for his cause.
  5. (countable, obsolete) Any subject of discussion or debate; a matter; an affair.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Sixt, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene i]:
      What counsel give you in this weighty cause?
  6. (countable, legal) A suit or action in court; any legal process by which a party endeavors to obtain his claim, or what he regards as his right; case; ground of action.
Synonyms
  • (source or reason) seeSynonyms en
  • (reason for a state) grounds, justification
  • (goal, aim or principle) seeSynonyms en
Translations Translations
Verb

cause (causes, present participle causing; past and past participle caused)

  1. (transitive) To set off an event or action.
    The lightning caused thunder.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314 ↗, page 0045 ↗:
      Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes. […] She put back a truant curl from her forehead where it had sought egress to the world, and looked him full in the face now, drawing a deep breath which caused the round of her bosom to lift the lace at her throat.
  2. (ditransitive) To actively produce as a result, by means of force or authority.
    His dogged determination caused the fundraising to be successful.
    • Bible, Book of Genesis vii.4
      I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days.
  3. To assign or show cause; to give a reason; to make excuse.
Translations Translations


This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.006
Offline English dictionary