censure
1350–1400 Middle English, from Old French, from Latin censūra ("censor's office or assessment"), from censere ("to tax, assess, value, judge, consider, etc."). Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ˈsɛn.sjə/, /ˈsɛn.ʃə/
  • (America) IPA: /ˈsɛn.ʃɚ/
Noun

censure

  1. The act of blaming, criticizing, or condemning as wrong; reprehension.
    • 1881, Thomas Babington Macaulay, “[https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica,_Ninth_Edition/Johnson,_Samuel Samuel Johnson]”, in Encyclopædia Britannica, Ninth Edition:
      2
  2. An official reprimand.
  3. Judicial or ecclesiastical sentence or reprimand; condemnatory judgment.
    • excommunication or other censure of the church
  4. (obsolete) Judgment either favorable or unfavorable; opinion.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene 3]:
      Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment.
Translations
  • Russian: порица́ние
  • Spanish: censura
Translations
  • Russian: вы́говор
Verb

censure (censures, present participle censuring; past and past participle censured)

  1. To criticize harshly.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene v]:
      I may be censured that nature thus gives way to loyalty.
  2. To formally rebuke.
  3. (obsolete) To form or express a judgment in regard to; to estimate; to judge.
    • 1625, John Fletcher; Philip Massinger, “The Elder Brother. A Comedy.”, in Comedies and Tragedies […], London: Printed for Humphrey Robinson, […], and for Humphrey Moseley […], published 1679, OCLC 3083972 ↗, Act 1, scene 2:
      Should I say more, you might well censure me a flatterer.
Synonyms Related terms


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