clutch
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /klʌt͡ʃ/
Verb

clutch (clutches, present participle clutching; past and past participle clutched)

  1. To seize, as though with claws. [from 14th c.]
    to clutch power
    • A man may set the poles together in his head, and clutch the whole globe at one intellectual grasp.
  2. c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene i], page 136 ↗, column 1:
    Is this a Dagger, which I ſee before me, [...] ? / Come, let me clutch thee: / I haue thee not, and yet I ſee thee ſtill.
  3. To grip or grasp tightly. [from 17th c.]
    She clutched her purse tightly and walked nervously into the building.
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, “The Life and Death of King Iohn”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene ii], page 8 ↗, column 1:
      Not that I haue the power to clutch my hand,
Synonyms Translations Noun

clutch (plural clutches)

  1. The claw of a predatory animal or bird. [from 13th c.]
  2. (by extension) A grip, especially one seen as rapacious or evil. [from 16th c.]
    • the clutch of poverty
      an expiring clutch at popularity
      I must have […] little care of myself, if I ever more come near the clutches of such a giant.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 57
      You scold yourself; you know it is only your nerves—and yet, and yet... In a little while it is impossible to resist the terror that seizes you, and you are helpless in the clutch of an unseen horror.
  3. A device to interrupt power transmission, commonly used between engine and gearbox in a car. [from 19th c.]
  4. The pedal in a car that disengages power transmission.
  5. Any device for gripping an object, as at the end of a chain or tackle.
  6. A small handbag or purse with no straps or handle.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      The clutch which I had made to save myself in falling had torn away this chin-band and let the lower jaw drop on the breast; but little else was disturbed, and there was Colonel John Mohune resting as he had been laid out a century ago.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations
  • Portuguese: bolsa carteira
  • Russian: клатч
Noun

clutch (plural clutches) (collective)

  1. A brood of chickens or a sitting of eggs. [from 18th c.]
  2. A group or bunch (of people or things). [from 20th c.]
Translations Verb

clutch (clutches, present participle clutching; past and past participle clutched)

  1. (transitive) To hatch.
Noun

clutch (plural clutches)

  1. (US) An important or critical situation.
Translations
  • Russian: переде́лка
Adjective

clutch

  1. (US, Canada) Performing or tending to perform well in difficult, high-pressure situations.



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.005
Offline English dictionary