companion
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /kəmˈpænjən/
Noun

companion (plural companions)

  1. A friend, acquaintance, or partner; someone with whom one spends time or keeps company
    His dog has been his trusted companion for the last five years.
    • 2017 September 27, David Browne, "Hugh Hefner, 'Playboy' Founder, Dead at 91 ↗," Rolling Stone
      For the most part, Hefner's female companions all adhered to the same mold: twentysomething, bosomy and blonde. "Well, I guess I know what I like," he once said when asked about his preferences.
    • RQ
  2. (dated) A person employed to accompany or travel with another.
  3. (nautical) The framework on the quarterdeck of a sailing ship through which daylight entered the cabins below.
  4. (nautical) The covering of a hatchway on an upper deck which leads to the companionway; the stairs themselves.
  5. (topology) A knot in whose neighborhood another, specified knot meets every meridian disk.
  6. (figuratively) A thing or phenomenon that is closely associated with another thing, phenomenon, or person.
  7. (attributive) An appended source of media or information, designed to be used in conjunction with and to enhance the main material.
    The companion guide gives an in-depth analysis of this particular translation.
  8. (astronomy) A celestial object that is associated with another.
  9. A knight of the lowest rank in certain orders.
    a companion of the Bath
  10. (obsolete, derogatory) A fellow; a rogue.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, III. i. 111:
      and let us knog our / prains together to be revenge on this same scald, scurvy, / cogging companion,
Synonyms Related terms Translations Verb

companion (companions, present participle companioning; past and past participle companioned)

  1. (obsolete) To be a companion to; to attend on; to accompany.
  2. (obsolete) To qualify as a companion; to make equal.
    • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene ii]:
      Companion me with my mistress.



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