comply
Pronunciation
  • (RP, GA) IPA: /kəmˈplaɪ/
Verb

comply

  1. To yield#Verb|yield assent#Noun|assent; to accord#Verb|accord; to acquiesce, agree, consent#Verb|consent; to adapt oneself, to conform.
    Synonyms: give way, Thesaurus:accede
    Antonyms: violate
    • 1671, John Milton, “Samson Agonistes, […]”, in Paradise Regain’d. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is Added, Samson Agonistes, London: Printed by J. M[acock] for John Starkey […], OCLC 228732398 ↗, lines 415–420, page 83 ↗:
      Maſters commands come with a power reſiſtleſs / To ſuch as owe them abſolute ſubjection; / And for a life who will not change his purpoſe? / (So mutable are all the ways of men) / Yet this be ſure, in nothing to comply / Scandalous or forbidden in our Law.
    • 1678, [Samuel Butler], “[The Third Part of Hudibras]”, in Hudibras. The Third and Last Part, London: Printed for Simon Miller, […], OCLC 123206337 ↗, canto III, page 226 ↗:
      He that complies againſt his Will / Is of his own opinion ſtill, / Which he may adhere to, yet diſown, / For Reaſons to himſelf beſt known, {{...}
    • 1719 April 24, [Daniel Defoe], The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, […], London: Printed by W[illiam] Taylor […], OCLC 15864594 ↗; 3rd edition, London: Printed by W[illiam] Taylor […], 1719, OCLC 838630407 ↗, page 303 ↗:
      He gave me all the Aſſurances that the Invention and Faith of Man could deviſe, that he would comply with theſe moſt reaſonable Demands, and beſides would owe his Life to me, and acknowledge it upon all Occaſions as long as he liv'd.
    • 1859 November 26 – 1860 August 25, [William] Wilkie Collins, “The Narrative of Eliza Michelson, Housekeeper at Blackwater Park”, in The Woman in White. A Novel, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, Publishers, Franklin Square, published 1860, OCLC 558180353 ↗, part I, page 157 ↗, column 2:
      On the day when the servants all left I was again sent for to see Sir Percival. The undeserved slur which he had cast on my management of the household did not, I am happy to say, prevent me from returning good for evil to the best of my ability, by complying with his request as readily and respectfully as ever.
  2. (archaic) To accomplish, to fulfil. [from late 16th c.]
    Synonyms: carry out, consummate
  3. (archaic) To be ceremoniously courteous; to make one's compliment#Noun|compliments.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, The Tragicall Historie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke: […] (Second Quarto), London: Printed by I[ames] R[oberts] for N[icholas] L[ing] […], published 1604, OCLC 760858814 ↗, [Act II, scene ii] ↗:
      [Y]our hands come then, th’appurtenance of welcome is faſhion and ceremonie; let mee comply with you in this garb, let me{{sic
  4. (archaic) To enfold; to embrace#Verb|embrace.
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