continent
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ˈkɒntɪnənt/
  • (GA) IPA: /ˈkɑntɪnənt/, [ˈkʰɑnʔɪnənt]
Noun

continent (plural continents)

  1. Each of the main continuous land-masses on the earth's surface, now generally regarded as seven in number, including their related islands, continental shelves etc.
    • 1624, John Donne, “17. Meditation”, in Deuotions upon Emergent Occasions, and Seuerall Steps in My Sicknes: […], London: Printed by A[ugustine] M[atthews] for Thomas Iones, OCLC 55189476 ↗; republished as Geoffrey Keynes, John Sparrow, editor, Devotions upon Emergent Occasions: […], Cambridge: At the University Press, 1923, OCLC 459265555 ↗, lines 2–3, page 98 ↗:
      No man is an Iland, intire of it selfe; every man is a peece of the Continent, a part of the maine; {{...}
  2. (obsolete in general sense) A large contiguous landmass considered independent of its islands, peninsulas etc. Specifically, the Old World continent of Europe–Asia–Africa. See the Continent.
  3. (obsolete) Land (as opposed to the water).
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.v:
      The carkas with the streame was carried downe, / But th'head fell backeward on the continent.
Translations Adjective

continent

  1. Exercising self-restraint; controlled, temperate with respect to one's bodily needs or passions, especially sex, urination and/or defecation.
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Othello, the Moore of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene i]:
      Have a continent forbearance till the speed of his rage goes slower.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 119:
      A celibate himself, he was of the opinion that marriage was something of a concession to human frailty, to save from fornication those who could not be continent, so it was better to marry than to burn with lust.
  2. Not interrupted; connected; continuous.
    a continent fever
    • The northeast part of Asia is, if not continent with the west side of America, yet certainly it is the least disjoined by sea of all that coast.
  3. (obsolete) Serving to restrain or limit; restraining; opposing.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene iv]:
      Have a continent forbearance till the speed of his rage goes slower.
Antonyms
Continent
Proper noun
  1. (obsolete) The Old World.
    Peter Heylin, 1652, Cosmographie, "the whole Continent of Europe, Asia, Africa."
  2. Synonym of Europe#English|Europe including Britain
  3. (UK) Mainland Europe, as seen from the British Isles.
Noun

continent (plural continents)

  1. An Encratite.



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.007
Offline English dictionary