countenance
Pronunciation
  • (British, America) IPA: /ˈkaʊn.tɪ.nəns/, /ˈkaʊn.tən.əns/, /ˈkaʊnt.nəns/
  • (AU) IPA: [kʲʰæũ̯.ʔɪ̆.nəns]
Noun

countenance

  1. Appearance, especially the features and expression of the face.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗:
      , Genesis 4:5
      But unto Cain and to his offering he had not respect. And Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell.
  2. Favour; support; encouragement.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Psalms 21:6 ↗:
      Thou hast made him […] glad with thy countenance.
    • This is the magistrate's peculiar province, to give countenance to piety and virtue, and to rebuke vice.
  3. (obsolete) Superficial appearance; show; pretense.
    • The election being done, he made countenance of great discontent thereat.
  4. Calm facial expression, composure, self-control.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations Verb

countenance (countenances, present participle countenancing; past and past participle countenanced)

  1. (transitive) To tolerate, support, sanction, patronise or approve of something.
    The cruel punishment was countenanced by the government, although it was not officially legal.
    • 1937, Willa Muir and Edwin Muir (translators), The Trial, (Der Prozess 1925, Franz Kafka), Vintage Books (London), pg. 99
      For the Defence was not actually countenanced by the Law, but only tolerated, and there were differences of opinion even on that point, whether the Law could be interpreted to admit such tolerances at all.
Synonyms Translations


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