course
Pronunciation
  • (RP) enPR: kôs, IPA: /kɔːs/
  • (GA) enPR: kôrs, IPA: /kɔːɹs/, /kɔɹs/
  • (rhotic, horse-hoarse) enPR: kōrs, IPA: /ko(ː)ɹs/
  • (nonrhotic, horse-hoarse) IPA: /koəs/
  • (Tasmania) IPA: /kɜːs/
Noun

course (plural courses)

  1. A sequence of events.
    The normal course of events seems to be just one damned thing after another.
    1. A normal or customary sequence.
      • c. 1595–1596, William Shakespeare, “A Midsommer Nights Dreame”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i]:
        The course of true love never did run smooth.
      • 1667, John Milton, “Book 10”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
        Day and night, / Seedtime and harvest, heat and hoary frost, / Shall hold their course.
    2. A programme, a chosen manner of proceeding.
    3. Any ordered process or sequence of steps.
    4. A learning program, as in a school.
      I need to take a French course.
      • 1661, John Fell (bishop), The Life of the most learned, reverend and pious Dr. H. Hammond ↗
        During the whole time of his abode in the university he generally spent thirteen hours of the day in study; by which assiduity besides an exact dispatch of the whole course of philosophy, he read over in a manner all classic authors that are extant […]
    5. (especially in medicine) A treatment plan.
      • 1932, Agatha Christie, The Thirteen Problems
        Miss Clark, alarmed at her increasing stoutness, was doing a course of what is popularly known as banting.
    6. A stage of a meal.
      We offer seafood as the first course.
    7. The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn.
      • Bible, 2 Chron. viii. 14
        He appointed […] the courses of the priests.
  2. A path that something or someone moves along.
    His illness ran its course.
    1. The itinerary of a race.
      The cross-country course passes the canal.
    2. A racecourse.
    3. The path taken by a flow of water; a watercourse.
    4. (sports) The trajectory of a ball, frisbee etc.
    5. (golf) A golf course.
    6. (nautical) The direction of movement of a vessel at any given moment.
      The ship changed its course 15 degrees towards south.
    7. (navigation) The intended passage of voyage, such as a boat, ship, airplane, spaceship, etc.
      A course was plotted to traverse the ocean.
  3. (nautical) The lowest square sail in a fully rigged mast, often named according to the mast.
    Main course and mainsail are the same thing in a sailing ship.
  4. (in the plural, courses, obsolete, euphemistic) menses#English|Menses.
  5. A row or file of objects.
    1. (masonry) A row of bricks or blocks.
      On a building that size, two crews could only lay two courses in a day.
    2. (roofing) A row of material that forms the roofing, waterproofing or flashing system.
    3. (textiles) In weft knitting, a single row of loops connecting the loops of the preceding and following rows.
  6. (music) One or more strings on some musical instruments (such as the guitar, lute or vihuela): if multiple, then closely spaced, tuned in unison or octaves and intended to played together.
Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • Russian: курс
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Verb

course (courses, present participle coursing; past and past participle coursed)

  1. To run or flow (especially of liquids and more particularly blood).
    The oil coursed through the engine.
    Blood pumped around the human body courses throughout all its veins and arteries.
    • 2013, Martina Hyde, "Is the pope Catholic?", The Guardian, 20 September 2013
      He is a South American, so perhaps revolutionary spirit courses through Francis's veins. But what, pray, does the Catholic church want with doubt?
  2. (transitive) To run through or over.
    • The bounding steed courses the dusty plain.
  3. (transitive) To pursue by tracking or estimating the course taken by one's prey; to follow or chase after.
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene vi]:
      We coursed him at the heels.
  4. (transitive) To cause to chase after or pursue game.
    to course greyhounds after deer
Translations Translations Adverb

course (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial) Alternative form of of course



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.005
Offline English dictionary