custom
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ˈkʌstəm/
Noun

custom

  1. Frequent repetition of the same behavior; way of behavior common to many; ordinary manner; habitual practice; method of doing, living or behaving.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Acts 16:21 ↗:
      And teach customs, which are not lawful for us to receive, neither to observe, being Romans.
    • 1847, Alfred Tennyson, The Princess: A Medley, London: Edward Moxon, […], OCLC 2024748 ↗, part 6:
      Moved beyond his custom, Gama said
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene iv]:
      A custom
      More honour'd in the breach than the observance.
  2. Traditional beliefs or rituals
    The Ancient Egyptian culture had many distinctive and interesting beliefs and customs.
  3. (UK) Habitual buying of goods; practice of frequenting, as a shop, factory, etc., for making purchases or giving orders; business support.
    • September 28, 1710, Joseph Addison, The Whig Examiner No. 3
      Let him have your custom, but not your votes.
  4. (legal) Long-established practice, considered as unwritten law, and resting for authority on long consent; usage. See Usage, and Prescription.
  5. (obsolete) Familiar acquaintance; familiarity.
    • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene ii]:
      Age can not wither her, nor custom stale
      Her infinite variety.
  6. (archaic, uncountable) toll, tax, or tribute.
    • 1769, Bible, Authorised King James Version, Oxford standard text, Romans, xiii, 7:
      Render therefore to all their dues: tribute to whom tribute is due; custom to whom custom; fear to whom fear; honour to whom honour.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Adjective

custom (not comparable)

  1. Created under particular specifications, specially to fit one's needs: specialized, unique, custom-made
    My feet are very large, so I need custom shoes.
  2. Own, personal, not standard or premade
    We can embroider a wide range of ready designs or a custom logo.
  3. (archaic) accustomed; usual
Related terms
  • custom made
Translations Verb

custom (customs, present participle customing; past and past participle customed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To make familiar; to accustom.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To supply with customers.
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To pay the customs of.
  4. (obsolete, intransitive) To have a custom.
    • On a bridge he custometh to fight. Edmund Spenser.
Related terms


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