dare
Pronunciation Verb

dare (dare, present participle daring; past dared, past participle dared)

  1. (intransitive) To have enough courage (to do something).
    I wouldn't dare argue with my boss.
    • 1611 April (first recorded performance), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Cymbeline”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene i]:
      The fellow dares not deceive me.
    • 1832, Thomas Macaulay, Parliamentary Reform
      Why then did not the ministers use their new law? Because they durst not, because they could not.
  2. (transitive) To defy or challenge (someone to do something)
    I dare you (to) kiss that girl.
  3. (transitive) To have enough courage to meet or do something, go somewhere, etc.; to face up to
    Will you dare death to reach your goal?
    • To wrest it from barbarism, to dare its solitudes.
  4. (transitive) To terrify; to daunt.
    • c.1609 , Beaumont and Fletcher, Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher (playwright), "The Maid's Tragedy", [Act IV, Scene I]:
      For I have done those follies, those mad mischiefs, Would dare a woman.
  5. (transitive) To catch (larks) by producing terror through the use of mirrors, scarlet cloth, a hawk, etc., so that they lie still till a net is thrown over them.
Translations Translations Translations Noun

dare (plural dares)

  1. A challenge to prove courage.
  2. The quality of daring; venturesomeness; boldness.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, “The First Part of Henry the Fourth, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene i]:
      It lends a lustre […] / A large dare to our great enterprise.
  3. Defiance; challenge.
    • Childish, unworthy dares / Are not enought to part our powers.
    • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene ii]:
      Sextus Pompeius / Hath given the dare to Caesar.
Translations Verb

dare (dares, present participle daring; past and past participle dared)

  1. (obsolete) To stare stupidly or vacantly; to gaze as though amazed or terrified. [16thc.]
  2. (obsolete) To lie or crouch down in fear. [16thc.]
Noun

dare (plural dares)

  1. A small fish, the dace.

DARE
Proper noun
  1. Acronym of w:Drug Abuse Resistance Education
  2. Acronym of w:Dictionary of American Regional English

Dare
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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