deliver
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /dɪˈlɪvə(ɹ)/
  • (GA) IPA: /dɪˈlɪvɚ/
Verb

deliver (delivers, present participle delivering; past and past participle delivered)

  1. To set free from restraint or danger.
    deliver a captive from the prison
    Synonyms: free, liberate, release
  2. (process) To do with birth.
    1. To assist in the birth of.
      the doctor delivered the baby
    2. (formal, with "of") To assist (a female) in bearing, that is, in bringing forth (a child).
      the duchess was delivered of a son
      the doctor is expected to deliver her of a daughter tomorrow
      • She was delivered safe and soon.
    3. To give birth to.
      she delivered a baby boy yesterday
  3. To free from or disburden of anything.
    • Tully was long ere he could be delivered of a few verses, and those poor ones.
  4. To bring or transport something to its destination.
    deliver a package;  deliver the mail
  5. To hand over or surrender (someone or something) to another.
    deliver the thief to the police
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Genesis 40:13 ↗:
      Thou shalt deliver Pharaoh's cup into his hand.
    • c. 1596–1599, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Fourth, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene iv]:
      The constables have delivered her over.
    • 1725, Homer; [Elijah Fenton], transl., “Book IV”, in The Odyssey of Homer. […], volume I, London: Printed for Bernard Lintot, OCLC 8736646 ↗:
      The exalted mind / All sense of woe delivers to the wind.
  6. (intransitive, informal) To produce what was expected or required.
    • 2004, Detroit News, Detroit Pistons: Champions at Work (page 86)
      "You know, he plays great sometimes when he doesn't score," Brown said. "Tonight, with Rip (Richard Hamilton) struggling, we needed somebody to step up, and he really did. He really delivered."
  7. To express in words or vocalizations, declare, utter, or vocalize.
    deliver a speech
  8. To give forth in action or exercise; to discharge.
    to deliver a blow
    • shaking his head and delivering some show of tears
    • 1822, [Walter Scott], Peveril of the Peak. [...] In Four Volumes, volume (please specify ), Edinburgh: Printed for Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Hurst, Robinson, and Co., OCLC 2392685 ↗:
  9. To discover; to show.
    • c. 1608–1609, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedy of Coriolanus”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene vi]:
      I'll deliver myself your loyal servant.
  10. (obsolete) To admit; to allow to pass.
  11. (medicine) To administer a drug.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations


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