determinate
Pronunciation
  • (adjective, noun) (British) IPA: /dɪˈtɜːmɪnət/
  • (verb) (British) IPA: /dɪˈtɜːmɪneɪt/
Adjective

determinate (not comparable)

  1. Distinct, clearly defined. [from 14th c.]
    • Quantity of words and a determinate number of feet.
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, Chapter VIII, p. 122,
      […] on account of his responsibility to Norman and Marigold, and on account of his now determinate age, he considered himself ineligible for more dangerous service.
  2. Fixed, set, unvarying. [from 16th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts II:
      hym have ye taken by the hondes of unrightewes persones, after he was delivered by the determinat counsell and foreknowledge of God, and have crucified and slayne hym [...].
  3. (biology) Of growth: ending once a genetically predetermined structure has formed.
  4. Conclusive; decisive; positive.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Acts 2:–23 ↗:
  5. (obsolete) Determined or resolved upon.
    • c. 1601–1602, William Shakespeare, “Twelfe Night, or VVhat You VVill”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene i]:
      My determinate voyage.
  6. Of determined purpose; resolute.
    • More determinate to do than skillful how to do.
Antonyms Related terms Translations Noun

determinate (plural determinates)

  1. (philosophy) A single state of a particular determinable attribute.
Verb

determinate (determinates, present participle determinating; past and past participle determinated)

  1. (obsolete) To bring to an end; to determine.
    • 1595 December 9 (first known performance)​, William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene iii]:
      The sly, slow hours shall not determinate / The dateless limit of thy dear exile.



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