direct
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /d(a)ɪˈɹɛkt/, /dəˈɹɛkt/, /daɪ̯əˈɹɛkt/
Adjective

direct

  1. Proceeding without deviation or interruption.
  2. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end.
    the most direct route between two buildings
  3. Straightforward; sincere.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene ii]:
      Be even and direct with me.
  4. Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous.
    • 1689 December (indicated as 1690), [John Locke], chapter 1, in Two Treatises of Government: […], London: […] Awnsham Churchill, […], OCLC 83985187 ↗:
      He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words.
    • a direct and avowed interference with elections
  5. In the line of descent; not collateral.
    a descendant in the direct line
  6. (astronomy) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; said of the motion of a celestial body.
  7. (political science) Pertaining to, or effected immediately by, action of the people through their votes instead of through one or more representatives or delegates.
    direct nomination; direct legislation
  8. (aviation, travel) having a single flight number.
Synonyms Antonyms Translations Adverb

direct

  1. Directly.
    • 2009, Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall, Fourth Estate 2010, p. 346:
      Presumably Mary is to carry messages that she, Anne, is too delicate to convey direct.
Verb

direct (directs, present participle directing; past and past participle directed)

  1. To manage, control, steer.
    to direct the affairs of a nation or the movements of an army
  2. To aim (something) at (something else).
    They directed their fire towards the men on the wall.
    He directed his question to the room in general.
  3. To point out or show to (somebody) the right course or way; to guide, as by pointing out the way.
    He directed me to the left-hand road.
    • the next points to which I will direct your attention
  4. To point out to with authority; to instruct as a superior; to order.
    She directed them to leave immediately.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, “The Merry VViues of VVindsor”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene ii]:
      I'll first direct my men what they shall do.
  5. (dated) To put a direction or address upon; to mark with the name and residence of the person to whom anything is sent.
    to direct a letter
Related terms Translations Translations
  • Russian: режиссировать
Translations Translations
  • Portuguese: direcionar
  • Russian: направля́ть
Translations


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