distaste
Pronunciation
  • enPR: dĭs-tāstʹ, IPA: /dɪsˈteɪst/
Noun

distaste (uncountable)

  1. A feeling of dislike, aversion or antipathy.
  2. (obsolete) Aversion of the taste; dislike, as of food or drink; disrelish.
  3. (obsolete) Discomfort; uneasiness.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Adversity
      Prosperity is not without many fears and distastes, and adversity is not without comforts and hopes.
  4. Alienation of affection; displeasure; anger.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book VIII ↗”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗, lines 8–9:
      On the part of Heav'n / Now alienated, diſtance and diſtaste,
Translations Verb

distaste (distastes, present participle distasting; past and past participle distasted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To dislike.
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene ii] ↗, column 1:
      How may I avoid#English|auoyde / (Although my will diſtaſte what it elected) / The Wife I choſe, there can be no evasion#English|euaſion / To blench from this, and to ſtand firme by honour.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: […], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970 ↗, partition II, section 4, member 1, subsection 1, page 296 ↗:
      Plato made it a great ſigne of an intemperate and corrupt common-wealth, where Lawyers and Phyſitians did abound, and the Romanes diſtaſted them ſo much, that they were often baniſhed out of theire city, as Pliny and Celſus relate, for 600 yeares not admitted.
  2. (intransitive) to be distasteful; to taste bad
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Othello, the Moore of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene iii]:
      Dangerous conceits are, in their natures, poisons. / Which at the first are scarce found to distaste,
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To offend; to disgust; to displease.
    • He thought it no policy to distaste the English or Irish by a course of reformation, but sought to please them.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To deprive of taste or relish; to make unsavory or distasteful.



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