do
Pronunciation
  • (British) enPR: do͞o, IPA: /duː/
  • (America, Canada) enPR: do͞o, IPA: /du/
  • (Australia) IPA: /dʉː/
  • (colloquial; for some speakers, when 'do' is unstressed and the next word starts with /j/) IPA: /d͡ʒ/

Verb

do (does, present participle doing; past did, past participle done)

  1. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker.
    1. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker in a question whose main verb is not another auxiliary verb or be.
      Do you go there often?
    2. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker in negations with the indicative and imperative moods.
      • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter IV, in The Celebrity: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., OCLC 222716698 ↗, page 51 ↗:
        “Well,” I answered, at first with uncertainty, then with inspiration, “he would do splendidly to lead your cotillon, if you think of having one.” ¶ “So you do not dance, Mr. Crocker?” ¶ I was somewhat set back by her perspicuity.
      I do not go there often.
      Do not listen to him.
    3. (auxiliary) A syntactic marker for emphasis with the indicative, imperative, and subjunctive moods.
      But I do go sometimes.
      Do tell us.
      It is important that he do come see me.
    4. (pro-verb) A syntactic marker that refers back to an earlier verb and allows the speaker to avoid repeating the verb; in most dialects, not used with auxiliaries such as be, though it can be in AAVE.
      I play tennis; she does too.
      They don't think it be like it is, but it do.
  2. (transitive) To perform; to execute.
    Synonyms: accomplish, carry out, functionate
    All you ever do is surf the Internet. What will you do this afternoon?
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To cause, make (someone) (do something).
    • a fatal plague which many did to die
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, 2 Corinthians 8:1 ↗:
      Moreover, brethren, we do you to wit [i.e. we make you to know] of the grace of God bestowed on the churches of Macedonia.
  4. (intransitive, transitive) To suffice.
    • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter IV, in The Celebrity: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., OCLC 222716698 ↗, page 51 ↗:
      “Well,” I answered, at first with uncertainty, then with inspiration, “he would do splendidly to lead your cotillon, if you think of having one.” ¶ “So you do not dance, Mr. Crocker?” ¶ I was somewhat set back by her perspicuity.
    it’s not the best broom, but it will have to do;  this will do me, thanks.
  5. (intransitive) To be reasonable or acceptable.
    It simply will not do to have dozens of children running around such a quiet event.
  6. (ditransitive) To have (as an effect).
    The fresh air did him some good.
  7. (intransitive) To fare, perform (well or poorly).
    Our relationship isn't doing very well;  how do you do?
  8. (transitive, chiefly in questions) To have as one's job.
    What does Bob do? — He's a plumber.
  9. To perform the tasks or actions associated with (something).
    "Don't forget to do your report" means something quite different depending on whether you're a student or a programmer.
  10. To cook.
    Synonyms: Thesaurus:cook
    I'll just do some eggs.
  11. (transitive) To travel in, to tour, to make a circuit of.
    • 1869, Louisa M[ay] Alcott, “Our Foreign Correspondent”, in Little Women: Or, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy, part second, Boston, Mass.: Roberts Brothers, OCLC 30743985 ↗, page 115 ↗:
      We 'did' London to our hearts' content,—thanks to Fred and Frank,—and were sorry to go away; {{...}
    Let’s do New York also.
  12. (transitive) To treat in a certain way.
  13. (transitive) To work for or on, by way of caring for, looking after, preparing, cleaning, keeping in order, etc.
    • Harper's Magazine
      The sergeants seem to do themselves pretty well.
  14. (intransitive, obsolete) To act or behave in a certain manner; to conduct oneself.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, 2 Kings 17:34 ↗:
      Unto this day they do after the former manners: they fear not the Lord, neither do they after their statutes, or after their ordinances, or after the law and commandment which the Lord commanded the children of Jacob, whom he named Israel
  15. (transitive) To spend (time) in jail. (See also do time)
    Synonyms: serve
    I did five years for armed robbery.
  16. (transitive) To impersonate or depict.
    Synonyms: imitate, personate, take off
    They really laughed when he did Clinton, with a perfect accent and a leer.
  17. (with 'a' and the name of a person, place, event, etc.) To copy or emulate the actions or behaviour that is associated with the person or thing mentioned.
    He did a Henry VIII and got married six times.
    He was planning to do a 9/11.
  18. (transitive, slang) To kill.
    Synonyms: do in, murder, off, rub out, Thesaurus:kill
  19. (transitive, slang) To deal with for good and all; to finish up; to undo; to ruin; to do for.
    • Sometimes they lie in wait in these dark streets, and fracture his skull, […] or break his arm, or cut the sinew of his wrist; and that they call doing him.
  20. (informal) To punish for a misdemeanor.
    He got done for speeding.
    Teacher'll do you for that!
  21. (transitive, slang) To have sex with. (See also do it)
    Synonyms: go to bed with, sleep with, Thesaurus:copulate with
    • c. 1588–1593, [William Shakespeare], The Most Lamentable Romaine Tragedie of Titus Andronicus: […] (First Quarto), London: Printed by Iohn Danter, and are to be sold by Edward White & Thomas Millington, […], published 1594, OCLC 222241046 ↗, [Act IV, scene ii] ↗:
      Deme. Villain what haſt thou done?
      A. That which thou canſt not vndoe.
      Chiron. Thou haſt vndone our mother.
      Aron. Villaine I haue done thy mother.
  22. (transitive) To cheat or swindle.
    Synonyms: defraud, diddle, mug off, rip off, scam, Thesaurus:deceive
    That guy just did me out of two hundred bucks!
    • He was not to be done, at his time of life, by frivolous offers of a compromise that might have secured him seventy-five per cent.
  23. (transitive) To convert into a certain form; especially, to translate.
    the novel has just been done into English;  I'm going to do this play into a movie
  24. (transitive, intransitive) To finish.
    Synonyms: conclude, finalize, Thesaurus:end
    Aren't you done yet?
  25. (UK, dated, intransitive) To work as a domestic servant (with for).
    Synonyms: attend, serve, wait on, Thesaurus:serve
  26. (archaic, dialectal, transitive, auxiliary) Used to form the present progressive of verbs.
  27. (stock exchange) To cash or to advance money for, as a bill or note.
  28. (informal, transitive, ditransitive) To make or provide.
    Synonyms: furnish, give, supply, Thesaurus:give
    Do they do haircuts there?
    Could you do me a burger with mayonnaise instead of ketchup?
  29. (informal, transitive) To injure (one's own body part).
    • "Defender Kolo Toure admitted Given will be a loss, but gave his backing to Nielsen. 'I think he's done his shoulder,' said the Ivorian."
      "Watto will spend the entire winter stretching and doing Pilates, and do a hamstring after bending down to pick up his petrol cap after dropping it filling his car at Caltex Cronulla."
      "'I knew straight away I'd done my ACL, I heard the sound - it was very loud and a few of the boys said they heard it as well,' Otten said."
  30. (transitive) To take drugs.
    I do cocaine.
  31. (transitive, in the form be doing [somewhere]) To exist with a purpose or for a reason.
    What's that car doing in our swimming pool?
Conjugation