draggled
Verb
  1. Simple past tense and past participle of draggle
Adjective

draggled

  1. Bedraggled.
    • 1765, Tobias Smollett, Travels Through France and Italy, Letter 34, Nice, 2 April, 1765,
      It was near ten at night, when we entered the auberge in such a draggled and miserable condition, that Mrs. Vanini almost fainted at sight of us, on the supposition that we had met with some terrible disaster, and that the rest of the company were killed.
    • 1891, Oscar Wilde, chapter VII, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, London; New York, N.Y.; Melbourne, Vic.: Ward Lock & Co., OCLC 34363729 ↗, page 131 ↗:
      Under the portico, with its grey sun-bleached pillars, loitered a troop of draggled bareheaded girls, waiting for the auction to be over.
    • 1894, [Robert William Chambers], chapter XVII, in In the Quarter, New York, N.Y.; Chicago, Ill.: F. Tennyson Neely, publisher, OCLC 10484790 ↗, page 313 ↗:
      Here, in front, the deserted street was white and black and silent, under the electric lamps. All the lonelier for two wretched gamins, counting their dirty sous, and draggled newspapers.
    • 1937, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Hobbit, Chapter 10, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012,
      Wet straw was in his draggled beard; he was so sore and stiff, so bruised and buffeted he could hardly stand or stumble through the shallow water to lie groaning on the shore.
    • 2015, Helen Macdonald, "Costa biography award 2014: H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald" in The Guardian, 6 January, 2015,
      By the late nineteenth century British goshawks were extinct. I have a photograph of the stuffed remains of one of the last birds to be shot; a black-and-white snapshot of a bird from a Scottish estate, draggled, stuffed and glassy-eyed.



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