echo
Pronunciation
    • (RP) IPA: /ˈɛkəʊ/
    • (America) IPA: /ˈɛkoʊ/

Noun

echo

  1. A reflected sound that is heard again by its initial observer.
    • c. 1588–1593, William Shakespeare, “The Lamentable Tragedy of Titus Andronicus”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene iii]:
      The babbling echo mocks the hounds.
    • 1709, Alexander Pope, Pastorals, Summer:
      The woods shall answer, and their echo ring.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, chapter X, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855 ↗:
      “Then what is your little trouble?” “My little trouble!” I felt that this sort of thing must be stopped at its source. It was only ten minutes to dressing-for-dinner time, and we could go on along these lines for hours. “Listen, old crumpet,” I said patiently. “Make up your mind whether you are my old friend Reginald Herring or an echo in the Swiss mountains. If you're simply going to repeat every word I say –”
  2. An utterance repeating what has just been said.
  3. (poetry) A device in verse in which a line ends with a word which recalls the sound of the last word of the preceding line.
  4. (figurative) Sympathetic recognition; response; answer.
    • Fame is the echo of actions, resounding them.
    • Many kind, and sincere speeches found an echo in his heart.
  5. (computing) The displaying on the command line of the command that has just been executed.
  6. The letter E in the ICAO spelling alphabet.
  7. (whist, bridge) A signal, played in the same manner as a trump signal, made by a player who holds four or more trumps (or, as played by some, exactly three trumps) and whose partner has led trumps or signalled for trumps.
  8. (whist, bridge) A signal showing the number held of a plain suit when a high card in that suit is led by one's partner.
  9. (medicine, colloquial) Echocardiography or echocardiogram.
Translations Translations
  • German: Tastaturecho, Bildschirmecho
  • Russian: э́хо
Translations
  • German: Echo, Emil (Germany)
  • Italian: Empoli
  • Russian: Еле́на

Verb

echo (echoes, present participle echoing; past and past participle echoed)

  1. (of a sound or sound waves, intransitive) To reflect off a surface and return.
  2. (transitive) To reflect back (a sound).
    • Those peals are echoed by the Trojan throng.
    • The wondrous sound / Is echoed on forever.
  3. (by extension, transitive) To repeat (another's speech, opinion etc.).
    Sid echoed his father's point of view.
  4. (computing, transitive) To repeat its input as input to some other device or system.
  5. (intransitive, whist, bridge) To give the echo signal, informing one's partner about cards one holds.
Synonyms Translations Translations
Echo
Proper noun
  1. (Greek mythology) An oread, punished by Hera by losing her own voice and only being able to mimic that of others.
  2. (astronomy) 60 Echo, a main belt asteroid.
Translations
  • German: Echo
  • Italian: Eco
  • Portuguese: Eco
  • Russian: Эхо́



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