educe
Verb

educe (educes, present participle educing; past and past participle educed)

  1. (transitive, now, rare) To direct the course of (a flow, journey etc.); to lead in a particular direction. [from 15th c.]
  2. (transitive) To infer or deduce (a result, theory etc.) from existing data or premises. [from 16th c.]
  3. (transitive) To draw out or bring forth from some basic or potential state; to elicit, to develop. [from 17th c.]
    • 1790, Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Men:
      The justice of God may be vindicated by a belief in a future state; but, only by believing that evil is educing good for the individual, and not for an imaginary whole.
  4. (transitive, chemistry) To isolate (a substance) from a compound; to extract. [from 17th c.]
  5. (transitive) To cause or generate; to bring about. [from 19th c.]
Translations
  • Spanish: educir
Translations
  • Spanish: educir
Noun

educe

  1. An inference.



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