effect
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /ɪˈfɛkt/
  • (GA) IPA: /əˈfɛkt/
  • (Malaysia, Singapore) IPA: /iˈfɛkt/
Noun

effect

  1. The result or outcome of a cause.
    The effect of the hurricane was a devastated landscape.
  2. Impression left on the mind; sensation produced.
    • patchwork […] introduced for oratorical effect
    • The effect was heightened by the wild and lonely nature of the place.
  3. Execution; performance; realization; operation.
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene v]:
      That no compunctious visitings of nature / Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between / The effect and it.
    1. (uncountable) The state of being binding and enforceable, as in a rule, policy, or law.
      The new law will come into effect on the first day of next year.
  4. (filmology) An illusion produced by technical means (as in "special effect")
    The effect of flying was most convincing.
  5. (sound engineering) An alteration, or device for producing an alteration, in sound after it has been produced by an instrument.
    I use an echo effect here to make the sound more mysterious.
    I just bought a couple of great effects.
  6. (physics, psychology, etc.) A scientific phenomenon, usually named after its discoverer.
    Doppler effect
  7. (usually, in the plural) Belongings, usually as personal effects.
  8. Consequence intended; purpose; meaning; general intent; with to.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, 2 Chronicles 34:22 ↗:
      They spake to her to that effect.
  9. (obsolete) Reality; actual meaning; fact, as distinguished from mere appearance.
    • no other in effect than what it seems
  10. (obsolete) Manifestation; expression; sign.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i]:
      All the large effects / That troop with majesty.
Related terms Translations Translations Translations
  • German: Effekt
  • Portuguese: efeito sonoro
  • Russian: эффе́кт
  • Spanish: efecto
Translations Translations Translations Verb

effect (effects, present participle effecting; past and past participle effected)

  1. (transitive) To make or bring about; to implement.
    The best way to effect change is to work with existing stakeholders.
  2. Misspelling of affect
Related terms Translations


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