egregious
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ɪˈɡɹiː.dʒəs/, /əˈɡɹiː.dʒi.əs/
Adjective

egregious

  1. Usually in a negative sense: conspicuous, exceptional, outstanding.
    The student has made egregious errors on the examination.
    • 16thC, Christopher Marlowe, Ignoto,
      I cannot cross my arms, or sigh "Ah me," / "Ah me forlorn!" egregious foppery! / I cannot buss thy fill, play with thy hair, / Swearing by Jove, "Thou art most debonnaire!"
    • c1605, William Shakespeare, All's Well That Ends Well, Act 2, Scene 3,
      My lord, you give me most egregious indignity.
    • 22 March 2012, Scott Tobias, AV Club The Hunger Games[http://www.avclub.com/articles/the-hunger-games,71293/]
      When the goal is simply to be as faithful as possible to the material—as if a movie were a marriage, and a rights contract the vow—the best result is a skillful abridgment, one that hits all the important marks without losing anything egregious.
  2. Outrageously bad; shocking#Adjective|shocking.
    • 1601, Ben Jonson, Poetaster or The Arraignment: […], London: Printed [by R. Bradock] for M[atthew] L[ownes] […], published 1602, OCLC 316392309 ↗, Act III, scene iv ↗:
      Tuc[ca]. […] Can thy Author doe it impudently enough? / Hiſt[rio]. O, I warrant you, Captaine: and ſpitefully inough too; he ha's one of the moſt ouerflowing villanous wits, in Rome. He will ſlander any man that breathes; If he diſguſt him. / Tucca. I'le know the poor, egregious, nitty Raſcall; and he haue ſuch commendable Qualities, I'le cheriſh him: {{...}
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