eject
Pronunciation
  • enPR: ĭ-jĕktʹ, IPA: /ɪˈdʒɛkt/
Verb

eject (ejects, present participle ejecting; past and past participle ejected)

  1. (transitive) To compel (a person or persons) to leave.
    • 2012, August 1. Peter Walker and Haroon Siddique in Guardian Unlimited, Eight Olympic badminton players disqualified for 'throwing games' ↗
      Four pairs of women's doubles badminton players, including the Chinese top seeds, have been ejected from the Olympic tournament for trying to throw matches in an effort to secure a more favourable quarter-final draw.
    The man started a fight and was ejected from the bar.
    Andrew was ejected from his apartment for not paying the rent.
  2. (transitive) To throw out or remove forcefully.
    In other news, a Montreal man was ejected from his car when he was involved in an accident.
  3. (US, transitive) To compel (a sports player) to leave the field because of inappropriate behaviour.
  4. (intransitive) To project oneself from an aircraft.
    The pilot lost control of the plane and had to eject.
  5. (transitive) To cause (something) to come out of a machine.
    Press that button to eject the video tape.
  6. (intransitive) To come out of a machine.
    I can't get this cassette to eject.
Synonyms Related terms Translations Translations Translations
  • Russian: изгоня́ть
Translations Translations Translations
  • Portuguese: ejetar
  • Russian: выта́лкиваться
Pronunciation
  • enPR: ēʹjĕkt, IPA: /ˈiː.dʒɛkt/
Noun

eject

  1. (psychology, countable) an inferred object of someone else's consciousness



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