entail
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ɛnˈteɪl/, /ɪnˈteɪl/, /ənˈteɪl/
Verb

entail (entails, present participle entailing; past and past participle entailed)

  1. (transitive) To imply or require.
    This activity will entail careful attention to detail.
  2. (transitive) To settle or fix inalienably on a person or thing, or on a person and his descendants or a certain line of descendants; -- said especially of an estate; to bestow as a heritage.
    • Allowing them to entail their estates.
    • c. 1591–1592, William Shakespeare, “The Third Part of Henry the Sixt, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i]:
      I here entail The crown to thee and to thine heirs forever.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To appoint hereditary possessor.
    • c. 1591–1592, William Shakespeare, “The Third Part of Henry the Sixt, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i]:
      To entail him and his heirs unto the crown.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To cut or carve in an ornamental way.
    • Entailed with curious antics.
Translations Translations Noun

entail (plural entails)

  1. That which is entailed. Hence:
    1. An estate in fee entailed, or limited in descent to a particular class of issue.
    2. The rule by which the descent is fixed.
    • A power of breaking the ancient entails, and of alienating their estates.
  2. (obsolete) Delicately carved ornamental work; intaglio.
    • A work of rich entail.
Translations


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