exile
Pronunciation
  • (America) IPA: /ˈɛɡˌzaɪl/, /ˈɛkˌsaɪl/
  • (British) IPA: /ˈɛkˌsaɪl/
Noun

exile

  1. (uncountable) The state of being banished from one's home or country.
    He lived in exile.
    They chose exile rather than assimilation.
    • c. 1590–1591, William Shakespeare, “The Two Gentlemen of Verona”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene iv]:
      Let them be recalled from their exile.
    Synonyms: banishment
  2. (countable) Someone who is banished from their home or country.
    • c. 1588–1593, William Shakespeare, “The Lamentable Tragedy of Titus Andronicus”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene iii]:
      Thou art an exile, and thou must not stay.
    She lived as an exile.
    Synonyms: expatriate, expat
Translations Translations Verb

exile (exiles, present participle exiling; past and past participle exiled)

  1. (transitive) To send into exile.
    • RQ
      Exiled from eternal God.
      c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene viii]:
      Calling home our exiled friends abroad.
    Synonyms: banish, forban
Translations


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