eye
Pronunciation Noun

eye (plural eyes)

  1. An organ through which animals see (perceive surroundings via light).
    Synonyms: Thesaurus:eye
    hypo en
    Bright lights really hurt my eyes.
  2. The visual sense.
    The car was quite pleasing to the eye, but impractical.
  3. The iris of the eye, being of a specified colour.
    Brown, blue, green, hazel eyes.
  4. Attention, notice.
    That dress caught her eye.
  5. The ability to notice what others might miss.
    Synonyms: perceptiveness
    He has an eye for talent.
  6. A meaningful stare or look.
    She was giving him the eye at the bar.
    When the car cut her off, she gave him the eye.
  7. A private eye: a privately hired detective or investigator.
    • 2003, Erik Larson, The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America, Random House, ISBN 0609608444, page 199
      Far more annoying were the letters from parents of missing daughters and the private detectives who had begun showing up at his door. Independently of each other, the Cigrand and Conner families had hired “eyes” to search for their missing daughters.
  8. A hole at the blunt end of a needle through which thread is passed.
  9. The oval hole of an axehead through which the axehandle is fitted.
  10. A fitting consisting of a loop of metal or other material, suitable for receiving a hook or the passage of a cord or line.
    Synonyms: eyelet
  11. The relatively clear and calm center of a hurricane or other such storm.
  12. A mark on an animal, such as a peacock or butterfly, resembling a human eye.
  13. The dark spot on a black-eyed pea.
  14. A reproductive bud in a potato.
  15. (informal) The dark brown center of a black-eyed Susan flower.
  16. A loop forming part of anything, or a hole through anything, to receive a rope, hook, pin, shaft, etc. — e.g. at the end of a tie bar in a bridge truss; through a crank; at the end of a rope; or through a millstone.
  17. That which resembles the eye in relative importance or beauty.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Life of Henry the Fift”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene vii]:
      the very eye of that proverb
  18. Tinge; shade of colour.
    • Red with an eye of blue makes a purple.
  19. One of the holes in certain kinds of cheese.
  20. (architecture) The circle in the centre of a volute.
  21. (typography) The enclosed counter (negative space) of the small letter e.
  22. (game of go) An empty point or group of points surrounded by one player's stones.
  23. (usually plural) View or opinion.
    This victory will make us great in the eyes of the world.
Verb

eye (eyes, present participle eyeing; past and past participle eyed)

  1. (transitive) To observe carefully or appraisingly.
    After eyeing the document for half an hour, she decided not to sign it.
    They went out and eyed the new car one last time before deciding.
    • 1859, Fraser's Magazine (volume 60, page 671)
      Each downcast monk in silence takes / His place a newmade grave around, / Each one his brother sadly eying.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To appear; to look.
    • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene iii]:
      My becomings kill me, when they do not eye well to you.
Translations Noun

eye (plural eyes)

  1. A brood.
    an eye of pheasants

Eye
Pronunciation Proper noun
  1. A place name, including:
    1. A small village in north (OS grid ref SO4963).
    2. A small town in Suffolk, England.
Proper noun
  1. (UK, colloquial, "the Eye") the comedic magazine Private Eye.
  2. (UK, "the Eye") The London Eye, a tourist attraction in London.



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.005
Offline English dictionary