faction
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ˈfæk.ʃən/, /ˈfæk.ʃn̩/
Noun

faction (plural factions)

  1. A group of people, especially within a political organization, which expresses a shared belief or opinion different from people who are not part of the group.
  2. Strife; discord.
    • 1805, Johann Georg Cleminius, Englisches Lesebuch für Kaufleute, pg. 188 ↗:
      Publick [sic] affairs soon fell into the utmost confusion, and in this state of faction and perplexity, the island continued, until its re-capture by the French in 1779.
    • 2001, Odd Magne Bakke, "Concord and Peace": A Rhetorical Analysis of the First Letter of Clement With an Emphasis on the Language of Unity and Sedition, publ. Mohr Siebeck, ISBN 3161476379, pg. 89 ↗:
      He asks the audience if they believe that they will be more loved by the gods if the city is in a state of faction than if they govern the city with good order and concord.
Related terms Translations Translations Noun

faction (plural factions)

  1. A form of literature, film etc., that treats real people or events as if they were fiction; a mix of fact and fiction
Related terms


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