fine
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /faɪn/,
  • (Tasmanian) IPA: /fæːn/
Adjective

fine (comparative finer, superlative finest)

  1. Senses referring to subjective quality.
    1. Of superior quality.
      The tree frog that they encountered was truly a fine specimen.
      Only a really fine wine could fully complement Lucía's hand-made pasta.
      • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314 ↗, page 0124 ↗:
        "A fine man, that Dunwody, yonder," commented the young captain, as they parted, and as he turned to his prisoner. "We'll see him on in Washington some day. He is strengthening his forces now against Mr. Benton out there. […]."
    2. (informal) Being acceptable, adequate, passable, or satisfactory.
      How are you today? – Fine.
      Will this one do? It's got a dent in it. – Yeah, it'll be fine, I guess.
      It's fine with me if you stay out late, so long as you're back by three.
    3. (informal) Good-looking, attractive.
      That man is so fine that I'd jump into his pants without a moment's hesitation.
    4. Subtle, delicately balanced or discriminated.
    5. (obsolete) Showy; overdecorated.
      • He gratified them with occasional […] fine writing.
    6. Delicate; subtle; exquisite; artful; dexterous.
      • c. 1604–1605, William Shakespeare, “All’s VVell, that Ends VVell”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene iii], page 253 ↗, column 2:
        Thou haſt ſpoken all alreadie, vnleſſe thou canſt ſay they are married, but thou art too fine in thy euidence, therefore ſtand aſide.
      • 1733, [Alexander Pope], An Essay on Man. […], (please specify ), London: Printed for J[ohn] Wilford, […], OCLC 960856019 ↗:
      • c. 1692, John Dryden, Discourse on Satire
        The nicest and most delicate touches of satire consist in fine raillery.
      • 1728, John Gay, The Beggar's Opera
        He has as fine a hand at picking a pocket as a woman.
    7. An answer often used to cover an unnecessary explanation, rather to avoid conflict or an argument. Saying "I'm fine" can be used to avoid inquiry when the speaker is not really okay.
      When a girl says she's "fine," she ain't fine.
  2. Senses referring to objective quality.
    1. Of a particular grade of quality, usually between very good and very fine, and below mint.
      The small scratch meant that his copy of “X-Men #2” was merely fine when it otherwise would have been “near mint”.
    2. (of weather) Sunny and not raining.
    3. Consisting of especially minute particulate; made up of particularly small pieces.
      • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Leviticus 2:7 ↗:
        And if thy oblation be a meate offering baken in the frying pan,it ſhalbe made of fine flowꝛe with oyle.
      Grind it into a fine powder.
      When she touched the artifact, it collapsed into a heap of fine dust.
    4. Particularly slender; especially thin, narrow, or of small girth.
      The threads were so fine that you had to look through a magnifying glass to see them.
    5. Made of slender or thin filaments.
      They protected themselves from the small parasites with a fine wire mesh.
    6. Having a (specified) proportion of pure metal in its composition.
      coins nine tenths fine
  3. (cricket) Behind the batsman and at a small angle to the line between the wickets.
    […] to nudge it through the covers (or tickle it down to fine leg) for a four […]
  4. (obsolete) Subtle; thin; tenuous.
    • 1626, Francis Bacon, Sylva Sylvarum, Or, A Naturall Historie: In Ten Centuries
      The eye standeth in the finer medium and the object in the grosser.
Synonyms Antonyms
  • (made up of particularly small pieces) coarse
  • (made of slender or thin filaments) coarse
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Adverb

fine

  1. Expression of (typically) reluctant agreement.
  2. Well, nicely, in a positive way.
    Everything worked out fine.
  3. (dated, dialect, colloquial) Finely; elegantly; delicately.
  4. (pool, billiards) In a manner so that the driven ball strikes the object ball so far to one side as to be barely deflected, the object ball being driven to one side.
Synonyms Translations
  • French: bien
  • German: gut
  • Italian: bene
  • Russian: отли́чно
Noun

fine (plural fines)

  1. Fine champagne; French brandy.
    • 1926, Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises, Scribner 2003, page 14:
      We had dined at l'Avenue's, and afterward went to the Café de Versailles for coffee. We had several fines after the coffee, and I said I must be going.
    • 1936, Djuna Barnes, Nightwood, Faber & Faber 2007, page 18:
      He refilled his glass. ‘The fine is very good,’ he said.
  2. (usually, in the plural) Something that is fine; fine particles.
    They filtered silt and fines out of the soil.
Verb

fine (fines, present participle fining; past and past participle fined)

  1. (transitive) To make finer, purer, or cleaner; to purify or clarify.
    to fine gold
    • It hath been fined and refined by […] learned men.
  2. (intransitive) To become finer, purer, or cleaner.
  3. To make finer, or less coarse, as in bulk, texture, etc.
    to fine the soil
  4. To change by fine gradations.
    to fine down a ship's lines, i.e. to diminish her lines gradually
    • I often sate at home / On evenings, watching how they fined themselves / With gradual conscience to a perfect night.
  5. (transitive) To clarify (wine and beer) by filtration.
  6. (intransitive, dated) To become gradually fine; to diminish; to dwindle (with away, down, or off).
    • I watched her [the ship] […] gradually fining down in the westward until I lost sight of her hull.
Synonyms Related terms Translations Related terms Pronunciation Noun

fine (plural fines)

  1. A fee levied as punishment for breaking the law.
    The fine for jay-walking has gone from two dollars to thirty in the last fifteen years.
Synonyms Translations Verb

fine (fines, present participle fining; past and past participle fined)

  1. (transitive) To issue a fine as punishment to (someone).
    She was fined a thousand dollars for littering, but she appealed.
  2. (intransitive) To pay a fine.
    • Men fined for the king's good will; or that he would remit his anger; women fined for leave to marry.
Synonyms Translations
  • German: mit einer Geldstrafe belegen
  • Italian: multare
  • Portuguese: multar
  • Russian: штрафова́ть
  • Spanish: multar
Related terms Pronunciation Noun

fine (plural fines)

  1. (music) The end of a musical composition.
  2. (music) The location in a musical score that indicates the end of the piece, particularly when the piece ends somewhere in the middle of the score due to a section of the music being repeated.
Verb

fine (fines, present participle fining; past and past participle fined)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To finish; to cease.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To cause to cease; to stop.
Noun

fine (plural fines)

  1. (obsolete) End; conclusion; termination; extinction.
    • to see their fatal fine
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene i]:
      Is this the fine of his fines?
  2. A final agreement concerning lands or rents between persons, as the lord and his vassal.
  3. (UK, legal) A sum of money or price paid for obtaining a benefit, favor, or privilege, as for admission to a copyhold, or for obtaining or renewing a lease.

Fine
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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