giddy
Pronunciation
  • (America) IPA: /ɡɪdi/
Adjective

giddy (comparative giddier, superlative giddiest)

  1. Dizzy, feeling dizzy or unsteady and as if about to fall down.
    The man became giddy upon standing up so fast.
  2. Causing dizziness: causing dizziness or a feeling of unsteadiness.
    They climbed to a giddy height.
  3. Lightheartedly silly, or joyfully elated.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant Of Venice, Act III Scene 2
      Hearing applause and universal shout,
      Giddy in spirit, still gazing, in a doubt
      Whether those peals of praise be his or no;
    The boy was giddy when he opened his birthday presents.
  4. (archaic) Frivolous, impulsive, inconsistent, changeable.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act V Scene 4
      In brief, since I do purpose to marry, I will think nothing to any purpose that the world can say against it; and therefore never flout at me for what I have said against it, for man is a giddy thing, and this is my conclusion.
    • 1784, William Cowper, Tirocinium; or, A Review of Schools
      Young heads are giddy and young hearts are warm,
      And make mistakes for manhood to reform.
Synonyms Translations Translations
  • French: étourdissant
  • German: schwindelerregend
  • Russian: головокружи́тельный
  • Spanish: mareador, vertiginoso
Translations Translations Verb

giddy (giddies, present participle giddying; past and past participle giddied)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To make dizzy or unsteady.
  2. To reel; to whirl.



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