goblin
Pronunciation
  • (America) IPA: /ˈɡɑb.lɪn/
  • (British) IPA: /ˈɡɒb.lɪn/
Noun

goblin (plural goblins)

  1. One of various hostile supernatural creatures, now especially (fantasy literature) a malevolent and grotesque diminutive humanoid.
    • c. 1620, anonymous, “Tom o' Bedlam” in Giles Earle his Booke (British Museum, Additional MSS. 24, 665):
      From yͤ hagg & hungry Goblin,
      yͭ into raggs would rend yee,
      & yͤ spirit yͭ stand’s by yͤ naked man,
      in yͤ booke of moones defend yee
    • 1872, George MacDonald, The Princess and the Goblin, page 50 ↗,
      " […] If he had struck a stroke more to the side just here," said the goblin, tapping the very stone, as it seemed to Curdie, against which his head lay, "he would have been through; but he's a couple of yards past it now, and if he follow the lode it will be a week before it leads him in. […] "
    • 2006, Charlotte Bishop, Norty: The Chosen Ones, page 187 ↗,
      At last the goblins had a chance to rid themselves of one of the troublesome defenders, and two goblin warriors snatched the opportunity.
    • 2010, Thom L. Nichols, War: Return of the Elves, Part 1, page 37 ↗,
      The goblin shifted the two younger ones closer to him. It looked like he was hiding behind them, using them as a shield.
      The goblin looked pure evil. His eyes were brown.
    • 2010, D. S. Macleod, The Middle Times: Rise of the Goblin King, page 229 ↗,
      I shall send another entourage of goblins back here to Desput with the goblins’ new ally the Pixy! These creatures deserve the same respect as any other goblin.
Synonyms Translations
GOBLin
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ˈɡɒb.lɪn/
Proper noun
  1. (British, rail transport, informal) Acronym of Gospel Oak to Barking Line, a railway line in north London.



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