gripe
Pronunciation
  • (GA) IPA: /ɡɹaɪp/
  • (British) IPA: /ɡɹʌɪp/
Verb

gripe (gripes, present participle griping; past griped, past participle griped)

  1. (intransitive, informal) To complain; to whine.
  2. (transitive, informal) To annoy or bother.
    What's griping you?
  3. (nautical) To tend to come up into the wind, as a ship which, when sailing close-hauled, requires constant labour at the helm.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To pinch; to distress. Specifically, to cause pinching and spasmodic pain to the bowels of, as by the effects of certain purgative or indigestible substances.
    • c. 1591–1592, William Shakespeare, “The Third Part of Henry the Sixt, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene iv]:
      How inly sorrow gripes his soul.
  5. (intransitive) To suffer griping pains.
  6. (obsolete, intransitive) To make a grab (to, towards, at or upon something).
  7. (archaic, transitive) To seize or grasp.
    • (More's Utopia)
      Wouldst thou gripe both gain and pleasure?
    • Unclutch his griping hand.
Synonyms Translations Noun

gripe (plural gripes)

  1. A complaint, often a petty or trivial one.
  2. (nautical) A wire rope, often used on davits and other life raft launching systems.
  3. (obsolete) grasp; clutch; grip
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene i]:
      A barren sceptre in my gripe.
    • 1764, Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto, I:
      The young peasant […] disengaged himself from Manfred's gripe […].
    • , The Mortal Immortal
      I started — I dropped the glass — the fluid flamed and glanced along the floor, while I felt Cornelius's gripe at my throat, as he shrieked aloud, "Wretch! you have destroyed the labour of my life!"
  4. (obsolete) That which is grasped; a handle; a grip.
    the gripe of a sword
  5. (engineering, dated) A device for grasping or holding anything; a brake to stop a wheel.
  6. (obsolete) Oppression; cruel exaction; affliction; pinching distress.
    the gripe of poverty
    • 1785, William Cowper, “The Garden”, in The Task, a Poem, in Six Books. By William Cowper […] To which are Added, by the Same Author, An Epistle to Joseph Hill, Esq. Tirocinium, or a Review of Schools, and The History of John Gilpin, London: Printed for J[oseph] Johnson, No. 72 St. Paul's Church-Yard, OCLC 221351486 ↗; republished as The Task. A Poem. In Six Books. To which is Added, Tirocinium: or, A Review of Schools, new edition, Philadelphia, Pa.: Printed for Thomas Dobson, bookseller, in Second-street, second door above Chestnut-street, 1787, OCLC 23630717 ↗, page 87 ↗:
      'Tis the cruel gripe, / That lean hard-handed poverty inflicts, / The hope of better things, the chance to win, / The wiſh to ſhine, the thirſt to be amus'd, / That at the found of Winter's hoary wing, / Unpeople all our counties, of ſuch herds, / Of flutt'ring, loit'ring, cringing, begging, looſe, / And wanton vagrants, as make London, vaſt / And boundless as it is, a crowded coop.
  7. (chiefly, in the plural) Pinching and spasmodic pain in the intestines.
  8. (nautical) The piece of timber that terminates the keel at the fore end; the forefoot.
  9. (nautical) The compass or sharpness of a ship's stern under the water, having a tendency to make her keep a good wind.
  10. (nautical) An assemblage of ropes, dead-eyes, and hocks, fastened to ringbolts in the deck, to secure the boats when hoisted.
  11. (obsolete) A vulture, Gyps fulvus; the griffin.
    • 1594, William Shakespeare, Lvcrece (First Quarto), London: Printed by Richard Field, for Iohn Harrison, […], OCLC 236076664 ↗:
      Like a white hind under the gripe's sharp claws.
Translations
  • Russian: жа́лоба
  • Spanish: queja, gimoteo (complaint), nimiedad (petty concern)
Translations
  • Russian: схва́тывание
Translations Translations
  • Russian: зажи́м
Translations
  • Russian: резь
Translations
  • Russian: резь



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.005
Offline English dictionary